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Phillips curve shocks and real exchange rate fluctuations: SVAR evidence

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  • Gehrke, Britta
  • Yao, Fang

Abstract

Steinsson (2008) shows that real shocks that affect the New Keynesian Phillips curve explain the behavior of the real exchange rate in a sticky-price business cycle model. This paper reveals that these shocks are important for the volatility of the real exchange rate in the data. In a structural VAR analysis, we identify productivity, labor supply, cost-push, government spending, risk premium, and monetary policy shocks using sign restrictions derived from Steinsson's model. We study different methods of variance decomposition. According to the forecast error variance decomposition, the real demand shocks are the most important source of real exchange rate volatility. At business cycle frequencies, however, three supply shocks account for up to 40 percent of real exchange rate fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Gehrke, Britta & Yao, Fang, 2014. "Phillips curve shocks and real exchange rate fluctuations: SVAR evidence," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 11/2014, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwqwdp:112014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    real exchange rate; supply shock; structural vector autoregression; sign restriction; business cycle variance decomposition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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