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Najam Us Saqib

Personal Details

First Name:Najam
Middle Name:Us
Last Name:Saqib
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psa1049

Affiliation

Pakistan Institute of Development Economics

Islamabad, Pakistan
http://www.pide.org.pk/

: (92)(51)9248051
(92)(51)9248065
P.O.Box 1091, Islamabad-44000
RePEc:edi:pideipk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Najam us Saqib & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Time Poverty, Work Status and Gender: The Case of Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 2012:81, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.

Articles

  1. Najam Us Saqib & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Time Poverty, Work Status and Gender: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(1), pages 23-46.
  2. Najam Saqib, 2006. "Dissertation abstract: The effect of involvement, time, and vividness on consumers’ value judgments: A test of prospect theory," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 9(2), pages 177-178, June.
  3. Najam us Saqib, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Primary Education in Rural Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 27-51.
  4. G. M. Arif & Najam Us Saqib, 2003. "Production of Cognitive and Life Skills in Public, Private, and NGO Schools in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 1-28.
  5. G. M. Arif & Najam US Saqib & G. M. Zahid, 1999. "Poverty, Gender, and Primary School Enrolment in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 979-992.
  6. Najam US Saqib, 1998. "A Critical Assessment of Free Public Schooling in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 955-976.
  7. Muhammad Hussain Malik & Najam Us Saqib, 1989. "Tax Incidence by Income Classes in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 13-26.
  8. NAJAM us SAQIB & ALlY A H. KHAN, 1988. "On an Empirical Definition of Money for Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 853-859.
  9. NAJAM us SAQIB & ATTIYA YASMIN, 1987. "Some Econometric Evidence on the Relative Importance of Monetary and Fiscal Policy in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 541-551.
  10. NAJAM us SAQIB & ATHER MAQSsOOD AHMED, 1986. "Estimation of Money Demand and Money Supply Functions for Pakistan: A Simultaneou~quations Approach," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 855-871.
  11. Muhammad Hussain Malik & Najam-Us-Saqib, 1985. "Who Bears the Burden of Federal Taxes in Pakistan?," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 24(3-4), pages 497-509.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Najam us Saqib & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Time Poverty, Work Status and Gender: The Case of Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 2012:81, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Tariq Mahmood & Najam us Saqib & Muhammad Ali Qasim, 2017. "Parental Effects on Primary School Enrolment under Different Types of Household Headship: Evidence from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 56(3), pages 249-264.
    2. Majid, H. & Siegmann, K.A., 2017. "Has growth been good for women’s employment in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 630, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.

Articles

  1. Najam Us Saqib & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Time Poverty, Work Status and Gender: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(1), pages 23-46.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Najam us Saqib, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Primary Education in Rural Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 27-51.

    Cited by:

    1. Tariq Mahmood & Najam us Saqib & Muhammad Ali Qasim, 2017. "Parental Effects on Primary School Enrolment under Different Types of Household Headship: Evidence from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 56(3), pages 249-264.
    2. Oussama BEN ABDELKARIM & Adel BEN YOUSSEF & Hatem M'HENNI & Christophe RAULT, 2014. "Testing the causality between electricity consumption, energy use and education in Africa," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1084, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Toseef Azid & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2010. "Who are the children going to school in Urban Punjab (Pakistan)?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(6), pages 442-465, May.
    4. Madeeha Gohar Qureshi, 2015. "Profile of Educational Outcomes by Gender: An Age Cohort Analysis," Working Papers id:7275, eSocialSciences.

  3. G. M. Arif & Najam Us Saqib, 2003. "Production of Cognitive and Life Skills in Public, Private, and NGO Schools in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 1-28.

    Cited by:

    1. Monazza Aslam & Geeta Kingdon, 2007. "What can Teachers do to Raise Pupil Achievement?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2007-14, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. M. Niaz Asadullah, 2016. "Do Pro-Poor Schools Reach Out to the Poor? Location Choice of BRAC and ROSC Schools in Bangladesh," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(4), pages 432-452, December.
    3. Naushin Mahmood, 2009. "Population and Development Demographic Research at PIDE," PIDE Books, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, number 2009:1 edited by Rashid Amjad & Aurangzeb A. Hashmi, September.
    4. Fatima Hafeez & Adnan Haider & Naeem uz Zafar, 2016. "Impact of Public-Private-Partnership Programmes on Students’ Learning Outcomes: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 55(4), pages 955-1017.
    5. Mohammad Niaz Asadullah & Nazmul Chaudhury, 2013. "Peaceful Coexistence? The Role of Religious Schools and NGOs in the Growth of Female Secondary Schooling in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 223-237, February.
    6. Paula Armstrong, 2014. "The impact of teacher characteristics on student performance: An analysis using hierarchical linear modelling," Working Papers 25/2014, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    7. Madeeha Gohar Qureshi, 2015. "Profile of Educational Outcomes by Gender: An Age Cohort Analysis," Working Papers id:7275, eSocialSciences.
    8. Shenila Rawal & Monazza Aslam & Baela Jamil, 2013. "Teacher Characteristics, Actions and Perceptions: What Matters for Student Achievement in Pakistan?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-19, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

  4. G. M. Arif & Najam US Saqib & G. M. Zahid, 1999. "Poverty, Gender, and Primary School Enrolment in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 979-992.

    Cited by:

    1. G. M. Arif & Najam Us Saqib, 2003. "Production of Cognitive and Life Skills in Public, Private, and NGO Schools in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 1-28.
    2. Shahnaz Hamid & Rehana Siddiqui, 2001. "Gender Differences in Demand for Schooling," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 40(4), pages 1077-1092.
    3. Madeeha Gohar Qureshi, 2015. "Profile of Educational Outcomes by Gender: An Age Cohort Analysis," Working Papers id:7275, eSocialSciences.
    4. Naushin Mahmood, 2004. "Transition in Primary and Secondary Schooling in Pakistan: Gender and Age Cohort Analysis," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 53-71.
    5. G. M. Arif, 2000. "Recent Rise in Poverty and Its Implications for Poor Households in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 1153-1170.
    6. G. M. Arif & Shujaat Farooq, 2012. "Poverty Reduction in Pakistan: Learning from the Experience of China," PIDE Monograph Series 2012:5, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    7. Saher Yusuf, 2013. "Analysis of gender gap at the school level in the punjab: Pakistan 2007-08," Pakistan Journal of Applied Economics, Applied Economics Research Centre, vol. 23(1), pages 13-30.
    8. Imran Ashraf Toor & Rizwana Parveen, 2004. "Factors Influencing Girls’ Primary Enrolment in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 141-157, Jul-Dec.

  5. Najam US Saqib, 1998. "A Critical Assessment of Free Public Schooling in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 955-976.

    Cited by:

    1. G. M. Arif & Najam Us Saqib, 2003. "Production of Cognitive and Life Skills in Public, Private, and NGO Schools in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 1-28.

  6. Muhammad Hussain Malik & Najam Us Saqib, 1989. "Tax Incidence by Income Classes in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 13-26.

    Cited by:

    1. Najam us Saqib, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Primary Education in Rural Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 27-51.
    2. Nasim Shah Shirazi & Muhammad Ilyas & Mehboob Ahmad, 2001. "Redistributive Effects of Fiscal Policy across the Income Groups in the Urban-Rural Areas of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 40(4), pages 519-533.
    3. Ahmed, Vaqar & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2009. "Redistributive effect of personal income taxation in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 16700, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Eduardo Engel & Alexander Galetovic & Claudio Raddatz, 1998. "Taxes and Income Distribution in Chile: Some Unpleasant Redistributive Arithmetic," Documentos de Trabajo 41, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    5. Ngee-Choon Chia & Wahba, Sadek & Whalley, John, 1992. "A general equilibrium based social policy model for Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 925, The World Bank.
    6. Rashid Amjad & A.R. Kemal, 1997. "Macroeconomic Policies and their Impact on Poverty Alleviation in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(1), pages 39-68.
    7. Najam US Saqib, 1998. "A Critical Assessment of Free Public Schooling in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 955-976.
    8. Anwar Shah & John Whalley, 1990. "An Alternative View of Tax Incidence Analysis for Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 3375, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Haroon Jamal* & Sohail Javed**, 2013. "Incidence of general sales tax in Pakistan : Latest estimate," Pakistan Journal of Applied Economics, Applied Economics Research Centre, vol. 23(2), pages 73-95.

  7. NAJAM us SAQIB & ALlY A H. KHAN, 1988. "On an Empirical Definition of Money for Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 853-859.

    Cited by:

    1. Mahmood ul Hasan Khan & Fida Hussain, 2005. "Monetary Aggregates in Pakistan: Theoretical and Empirical Underpinnings," SBP Working Paper Series 07, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department.

  8. NAJAM us SAQIB & ATTIYA YASMIN, 1987. "Some Econometric Evidence on the Relative Importance of Monetary and Fiscal Policy in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 541-551.

    Cited by:

    1. Md. Habibur Rahman, 2009. "Relative Effectiveness of Monetary and Fiscal Policies on Output Growth in Bangladesh: A VAR Approach," Working Papers id:2100, eSocialSciences.
    2. Syed Ammad & Sabihuddin Butt & Shaista Alam, 2012. "Fiscal Responsiveness, Persistence and Discretion: A Case Study of Pakistan," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 15(45), pages 227-244, September.
    3. Sunday Osahon Igbinedion & Frank Iyekoretin Ogbeide, 2016. "Monetary Policy and Manufacturing Capacity Utilization: Further Evidence from Nigeria," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 14(2), pages 159-174.
    4. M. Aynul Hasan & Qazi Masood Ahmed, 1991. "Endogeneity of Monetary Policy Reaction Function: An Experience from Pakistan's Economy," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 30(4), pages 931-941.

  9. Muhammad Hussain Malik & Najam-Us-Saqib, 1985. "Who Bears the Burden of Federal Taxes in Pakistan?," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 24(3-4), pages 497-509.

    Cited by:

    1. Najam us Saqib, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Primary Education in Rural Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 27-51.
    2. Nasim Shah Shirazi & Muhammad Ilyas & Mehboob Ahmad, 2001. "Redistributive Effects of Fiscal Policy across the Income Groups in the Urban-Rural Areas of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 40(4), pages 519-533.
    3. Najam US Saqib, 1998. "A Critical Assessment of Free Public Schooling in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 955-976.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2012-06-25
  2. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2012-06-25
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-06-25

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