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Zahra Murad

Personal Details

First Name:Zahra
Middle Name:
Last Name:Murad
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmu375

Affiliation

(50%) Economics and Finance Group
Portsmouth Business School
University of Portsmouth

Portsmouth, United Kingdom
http://www.port.ac.uk/economics-and-finance/
RePEc:edi:depbsuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Portsmouth Business School
University of Portsmouth

Portsmouth, United Kingdom
http://www.port.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:bsprtuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Zahra Murad & Robert Dowell, 2020. "Foreign visa salary requirement and natives’ reservation wages," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2020-06, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  2. Nigel Burnell & Irina Cojuharenco & Zahra Murad, 2020. "He Taught, She Taught: The effect of teaching style, academic credentials, bias awareness and academic discipline on gender bias in teaching evaluations," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2020-05, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  3. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer, 2020. "Confidence Snowballing and Relative Performance Feedback," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2020-08, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  4. Mantilla, Cesar & Murad, Zahra, 2020. "Ego-relevance in team production," SocArXiv zy248, Center for Open Science.
  5. Shimaa Elkomy & Zahra Murad & Veronica Veleanu, 2018. "Does Leadership Matter for Healthcare Service Quality? Evidence from NHS England," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-08, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  6. Zahra Murad & Charitini Stavropoulou & Graham Cookson, 2018. "Incentives and Gender in a Multitask Setting: an Experimental Study with Real-Effort Tasks," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-07, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  7. Lingbo Huang & Zahra Murad, 2018. "Fighting alone or fighting for a team: Evidence from experimental pairwise contests," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-06, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  8. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer & Martin Sefton, 2014. "How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?," Discussion Papers 2014-05, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

Articles

  1. Huang, Lingbo & Murad, Zahra, 2021. "Fighting alone versus fighting for a team: An experiment on multiple pairwise contests," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 616-631.
  2. Zahra Murad & Charitini Stavropoulou & Graham Cookson, 2019. "Incentives and gender in a multi-task setting: An experimental study with real-effort tasks," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(3), pages 1-18, March.
  3. Murad, Zahra, 2016. "Does group discussion lead to better informed and more strategic market entry decisions?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 25-28.
  4. Zahra Murad & Martin Sefton & Chris Starmer, 2016. "How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 52(1), pages 21-46, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer & Martin Sefton, 2014. "How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?," Discussion Papers 2014-05, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

    Mentioned in:

    1. How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?
      by Alessandro Cerboni in Knowledge Team on 2014-08-10 01:55:25

Working papers

  1. Zahra Murad & Charitini Stavropoulou & Graham Cookson, 2018. "Incentives and Gender in a Multitask Setting: an Experimental Study with Real-Effort Tasks," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-07, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefan, Matthias & Huber, Jürgen & Kirchler, Michael & Sutter, Matthias & Walzl, Markus, 2020. "Monetary and Social Incentives in Multi-Tasking: The Ranking Substitution Effect," IZA Discussion Papers 13345, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Steven Jacob Bosworth & Simon Bartke, 2019. "Cross-task spillovers in workplace teams: Motivation vs. learning," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-15, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  2. Lingbo Huang & Zahra Murad, 2018. "Fighting alone or fighting for a team: Evidence from experimental pairwise contests," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-06, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Baptiste Vilain, 2018. "Three essays in applied economics," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/64devegb4f8, Sciences Po.

  3. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer & Martin Sefton, 2014. "How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?," Discussion Papers 2014-05, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

    Cited by:

    1. Barron, Kai & Gravert, Christina, 2018. "Confidence and career choices: An experiment," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2018-301, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    2. Pannenberg, Markus & Friehe, Tim, 2019. "Does it really get better with age? Life-cycle patterns of confidence in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203497, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus, 2019. "Overconfidence over the lifespan: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    4. Ghazala Azmat & Manuel Bagues & Antonio Cabrales & Nagore Iriberri, 2018. "What you don’t know... Can’t hurt you? A natural field experiment on relative performance feedback in higher education," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5r0qo9lp3v9, Sciences Po.
    5. Orestis Kopsacheilis, 2018. "The role of information search and its influence on risk preferences," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 311-339, May.
    6. Thomas Dohmen & Simone Quercia & Jana Willrodt, 2018. "Willingness to take risk: The role of risk conception and optimism," Working Papers 2018-056, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer, 2020. "Confidence Snowballing and Relative Performance Feedback," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2020-08, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
    8. Barron, Kai & Gravert, Christina, 2018. "Beliefs and actions: How a shift in confidence affects choices," MPRA Paper 84743, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. d'Amato, Alessio & Goeschl, Timo & Lorè, Luisa & Zoli, Mariangela, 2020. "Date Marks, Valuation, and Food Waste: Three In-Store ‘Eggsperiments’," Working Papers 0693, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    10. Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus, 2021. "Time preferences and overconfident beliefs: Evidence from germany," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 92(C).
    11. Robin Cubitt & Orestis Kopsacheilis & Chris Starmer, 2019. "An inquiry into the nature and causes of the Description - Experience gap," Discussion Papers 2019-15, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    12. Cheung, Stephen L. & Johnstone, Lachlan, 2017. "True Overconfidence, Revealed through Actions: An Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10545, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Daniela Di Cagno & Daniela Grieco, 2019. "Measuring and Disentangling Ambiguity and Confidence in the Lab," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-22, February.
    14. Ghazala Azmat & Manuel Bagues & Antonio Cabrales & Nagore Iriberri, 2019. "What You Don’t Know…Can’t Hurt You? A Natural Field Experiment on Relative Performance Feedback in Higher Education," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 65(8), pages 3714-3736, August.
    15. Alessandro Bucciol & Simone Quercia & Alessia Sconti, 2020. "Promoting Financial Literacy among the Elderly: Consequences on Confidence," Working Papers 12/2020, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    16. Merkle, Christoph, 2017. "Financial overconfidence over time: Foresight, hindsight, and insight of investors," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 68-87.

Articles

  1. Zahra Murad & Charitini Stavropoulou & Graham Cookson, 2019. "Incentives and gender in a multi-task setting: An experimental study with real-effort tasks," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(3), pages 1-18, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Murad, Zahra, 2016. "Does group discussion lead to better informed and more strategic market entry decisions?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 25-28.

    Cited by:

    1. Zahra Murad & Chris Starmer, 2020. "Confidence Snowballing and Relative Performance Feedback," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2020-08, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.

  3. Zahra Murad & Martin Sefton & Chris Starmer, 2016. "How do risk attitudes affect measured confidence?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 52(1), pages 21-46, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 11 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (9) 2014-06-14 2014-12-24 2016-01-29 2018-10-08 2018-10-08 2020-05-11 2020-05-18 2020-09-14 2020-11-16. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (7) 2014-06-14 2014-12-24 2016-01-29 2018-10-08 2018-10-08 2020-05-18 2020-09-14. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (3) 2018-10-08 2018-10-08 2020-05-18. Author is listed
  4. NEP-GEN: Gender (2) 2020-04-27 2020-05-11
  5. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2014-06-14 2014-12-24
  6. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2018-10-08
  7. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2020-04-27
  8. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2018-10-08
  9. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2020-05-11
  10. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2018-10-08
  11. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (1) 2018-10-08

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