IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pln3.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Lars Lonstrup
(Lars Lønstrup)

Personal Details

First Name:Lars
Middle Name:
Last Name:Lonstrup
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pln3
https://sites.google.com/site/larslonstrup/

Affiliation

(44%) Institut for Virksomhedsledelse og Økonomi
Syddansk Universitet

Odense, Denmark
http://www.sdu.dk/ivoe

65 50 32 33
65 50 32 37
Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M
RePEc:edi:okioudk (more details at EDIRC)

(44%) Historical Economics and Development Group (HEDG)
Institut for Virksomhedsledelse og Økonomi
Syddansk Universitet

Odense, Denmark
http://www.sdu.dk/ivoe/hedg

65 50 32 33
65 50 32 37
65 50 32 33
RePEc:edi:hdsdudk (more details at EDIRC)

(8%) Dansk Center for Sundhedsøkonomi (DaCHE)
Syddansk Universitet

Sønderborg, Denmark
https://www.sdu.dk/da/om_sdu/institutter_centre/ist_sundhedstjenesteforsk/forskning/dache_healtheconomics

(+45) 6550 3081
(+45) 6550 3880
Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M
RePEc:edi:hesdudk (more details at EDIRC)

(4%) Network for Studies on Pensions, Aging and Retirement (NetSPAR)

Tilburg, Netherlands
http://www.netspar.nl/

+31 134662109
+31 134663066
P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg
RePEc:edi:netspnl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Philipp Ager & Katherine Eriksson & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2019. "How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Shaped Economic Activity in the American West," NBER Working Papers 25727, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ager, Philipp & Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2016. "Church Membership and Social Insurance: Evidence from the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 7/2016, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
  3. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2015. "Shaking up the Equilibrium: Natural Disasters, Immigration and Economic Geography," Discussion Papers 15-17, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  4. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "Church Membership and Social Insurance: Evidence from the American South," Discussion Papers 14-29, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  5. Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "The Fertility Transition in the US: Schooling or Income?," Economics Working Papers 2014-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  6. Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2013. "The Rise of Life Expectancy and Economic Growth in the 20th Century," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 16/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
  7. Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2011. "Life expectancy and income: The Ben-Porath mechanism revisited," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 3/2011, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

Articles

  1. Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2015. "The Rise in Life Expectancy and Economic Growth in the 20th Century," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(584), pages 838-852, May.
  2. Casper Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2012. "Can higher life expectancy induce more schooling and earlier retirement?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1249-1264, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ager, Philipp & Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2016. "Church Membership and Social Insurance: Evidence from the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 7/2016, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Silveus, Neil & Stoddard, Christiana, 2020. "Identifying the causal effect of income on religiosity using the Earned Income Tax Credit," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 903-924.
    2. Ferrara, Andreas & Testa, Patrick A., 2020. "Resource Blessing? Oil, Risk, and Religious Communities as Social Insurance in the U.S. South," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 513, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Ager, Philipp & Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2018. "Shaking Up the Equilibrium: Natural Disasters, Economic Activity, and Immigration," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 2/2018, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

  2. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "Church Membership and Social Insurance: Evidence from the American South," Discussion Papers 14-29, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Ager & Antonio Ciccone, 2018. "Agricultural Risk and the Spread of Religious Communities," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 16(4), pages 1021-1068.
    2. Jeanet Sinding Bentzen, 2015. "Acts of God? Religiosity and Natural Disasters Across Subnational World Districts," Discussion Papers 15-06, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    3. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2015. "Shaking up the Equilibrium: Natural Disasters, Immigration and Economic Geography," Discussion Papers 15-17, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

  3. Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "The Fertility Transition in the US: Schooling or Income?," Economics Working Papers 2014-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen, 2018. "Fertility and Early-Life Mortality: Evidence from Smallpox Vaccination in Sweden," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 487-521.
    2. Grimm, Michael, 2016. "Rainfall Risk and Fertility: Evidence from Farm Settlements during the American Demographic Transition," IZA Discussion Papers 10351, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Grimm, Michael, 2017. "Rainfall risk, fertility and development: Evidence from farm settlements during the American demographic transition," Ruhr Economic Papers 718, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

  4. Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2013. "The Rise of Life Expectancy and Economic Growth in the 20th Century," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 16/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Zhaohua & Asghar, Muhammad Mansoor & Zaidi, Syed Anees Haider & Nawaz, Kishwar & Wang, Bo & Zhao, Wehui & Xu, Fengxing, 2020. "The dynamic relationship between economic growth and life expectancy: Contradictory role of energy consumption and financial development in Pakistan," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 257-266.
    2. Herzer, Dierk & Nagel, Korbinian, 2019. "The impact of adult and non-adult mortality on development: Two centuries evidence from a panel of industrial countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 352-371.
    3. Bauernschuster, Stefan & Driva, Anastasia & Hornung, Erik, 2018. "Bismarck's Health Insurance and the Mortality Decline," IZA Discussion Papers 11628, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Baldanzi, Annarita & Prettner, Klaus & Tscheuschner, Paul, 2017. "Longevity-induced vertical innovation and the tradeoff between life and growth," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 31-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    5. Bloom, David E. & Kuhn, Michael & Prettner, Klaus, 2018. "Health and Economic Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 11939, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Rainer Franz Kotschy, 2019. "Health Dynamics Shape Life-Cycle Incomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 7953, CESifo.
    7. Muhammad Shahbaz & Muhammad Shafiullah & Mantu K. Mahalik, 2019. "The dynamics of financial development, globalisation, economic growth and life expectancy in sub‐Saharan Africa," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 444-479, December.
    8. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Rainer Kotschy & Klaus Prettner & Johannes J. Schünemann, 2019. "Health and Economic Growth: Reconciling the Micro and Macro Evidence," NBER Working Papers 26003, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Kant, Chander, 2018. "Privatization and growth: natural experiment of European economies in transition," MPRA Paper 96080, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 28 Sep 2019.
    10. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Hansen, Casper Worm & Strulik, Holger, 2018. "Physiological Aging around the World and Economic Growth," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 375, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    11. Biyase, Mduduzi & Malesa, Mokgadi, 2019. "Life Expectancy and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Southern African Development Community," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 72(3), pages 351-366.
    12. Hansen, Casper Worm & Strulik, Holger, 2015. "Life expectancy and education: Evidence from the cardiovascular revolution," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 261, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    13. Lei He & Na Li, 2020. "The linkages between life expectancy and economic growth: some new evidence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 58(5), pages 2381-2402, May.
    14. David E. Bloom & Michael Kuhn & Klaus Prettner, 2020. "Modern Infectious Diseases: Macroeconomic Impacts and Policy Responses," Working Papers 2020-17, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    15. Mujaheed Shaikh & Afschin Gandjour, 2019. "Pharmaceutical expenditure and gross domestic product: Evidence of simultaneous effects using a two‐step instrumental variables strategy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 101-122, January.
    16. Gallardo-Albarrán, Daniel, 2018. "Health and economic development since 1900," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 228-237.
    17. Klasing, Mariko Jasmin & Klasing, Mariko J. & Milionis, Petros, 2016. "The International Epidemiological Transition and the Education Gender Gap," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145771, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    18. MAHYAR Hami, 2016. "Economic Growth And Life Expectancy: The Case Of Iran," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 11(1), pages 80-87, April.

  5. Hansen, Casper Worm & Lønstrup, Lars, 2011. "Life expectancy and income: The Ben-Porath mechanism revisited," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 3/2011, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Даниелян, Владимир, 2016. "Детерминанты Пенсионного Возраста: Обзор Исследований [Determinants of Retirement Age: A Review of Research]," MPRA Paper 73865, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2015. "The Rise in Life Expectancy and Economic Growth in the 20th Century," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(584), pages 838-852, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Casper Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2012. "Can higher life expectancy induce more schooling and earlier retirement?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1249-1264, October.

    Cited by:

    1. von Gaessler, Anne Edle & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2016. "Optimal education in times of ageing: The dependency ratio in the Uzawa–Lucas growth model," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 125-142.
    2. Herzer, Dierk & Nagel, Korbinian, 2019. "The impact of adult and non-adult mortality on development: Two centuries evidence from a panel of industrial countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 352-371.
    3. Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Holger Strulik, 2012. "The Genesis of the Golden Age - Accounting for the Rise in Health and Leisure," Discussion Papers 12-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    4. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ken Tabata, 2016. "Demographic change, human capital accumulation and R&D-based growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 49(2), pages 707-737, May.
    5. Strulik, Holger & Werner, Katharina, 2013. "50 is the new 30: Long-run trends of schooling and retirement explained by human aging," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 152, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    6. Nina Boberg-Fazlic, 2012. "Longevity and Schooling: The Case of Retirement," Discussion Papers 12-15, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    7. Strulik, Holger & Werner, Katharina, 2014. "Elite education, mass education, and the transition to modern growth," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 205, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    8. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Hansen, Casper Worm & Strulik, Holger, 2018. "Physiological Aging around the World and Economic Growth," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 375, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    9. Cervellati, Matteo & Sunde, Uwe, 2013. "Life Expectancy, Schooling, and Lifetime Labor Supply: Theory and Evidence Revisited," Munich Reprints in Economics 20077, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    10. Herzer, Dierk, 2020. "How does mortality affect innovative activity in the long run?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 125(C).
    11. Hansen, Casper Worm, 2012. "The effect of life expectancy on schooling: Evidence from the international health transition," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 6/2012, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    12. Cai, Zhipeng & Lau, Sau-Him Paul, 2017. "Impact of mortality reductions on years of schooling and expected lifetime labor supply," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 134-144.
    13. Pan Liu, 2015. "Life expectancy, schooling and lifetime labor supply: the Ben-Porath mechanism revisited," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 133-139.
    14. Hansen, Casper Worm & Strulik, Holger, 2015. "Life expectancy and education: Evidence from the cardiovascular revolution," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 261, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    15. Holger Strulik & Katharina Werner, 2015. "Elite Education, Mass Education, and the Transition to Modern Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 5619, CESifo.
    16. David de la Croix, 2015. "Did Longer Lives Buy Economic Growth? From Malthus to Lucas and Ben-Porath," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2015012, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    17. Strulik, Holger & Werner, Katharina, 2012. "Life Expectancy, Labor Supply, and Long-Run Growth: Reconciling Theory and Evidence," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-497, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    18. Sau-Him Lau, 2013. "Does longevity improvement always raise the length of schooling through the longer-horizon mechanism?," 2013 Meeting Papers 292, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    19. Terri Friedline & Mary Rauktis, 2014. "Young People Are the Front Lines of Financial Inclusion: A Review of 45 Years of Research," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 535-602, October.
    20. Hansen, Casper Worm, 2013. "Life expectancy and human capital: Evidence from the international epidemiological transition," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1142-1152.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (4) 2013-10-25 2014-12-29 2016-11-06 2019-04-15
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (2) 2011-07-13 2013-10-25
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (2) 2015-11-01 2019-04-15
  4. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (2) 2014-01-17 2015-11-01
  5. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (2) 2014-12-29 2016-11-06
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-07-13
  7. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2013-10-25
  8. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2011-07-13
  9. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2011-07-13
  10. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2015-11-01
  11. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2014-12-29
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2019-04-15

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Lars Lonstrup
(Lars Lønstrup) should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.