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Ferran Elias

Personal Details

First Name:Ferran
Middle Name:
Last Name:Elias
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pel189

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Arts and Sciences
Columbia University

New York City, New York (United States)
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/economics/

: (212) 854-3680
(212) 854-8059
1022 International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027
RePEc:edi:declbus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Joan Monras & Javier Vázquez-Grenno & Ferran Elias, 2017. "Understanding the Effects of Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1708, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Germà Bel & Ferran Elias-Moreno, 2009. "Institutional Determinants of Military Spending," IREA Working Papers 200922, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Oct 2009.

Articles

  1. Albalate, Daniel & Bel, Germà & Elias, Ferran, 2012. "Institutional determinants of military spending," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 279-290.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Joan Monras & Javier Vázquez-Grenno & Ferran Elias, 2017. "Understanding the Effects of Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1708, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Ortega, Francesc & Edwards, Ryan & Hsin, Amy, 2018. "The Economic Effects of Providing Legal Status to DREAMers," IZA Discussion Papers 11281, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Germà Bel & Ferran Elias-Moreno, 2009. "Institutional Determinants of Military Spending," IREA Working Papers 200922, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Oct 2009.

    Cited by:

    1. Potrafke, Niklas, 2010. "The growth of public health expenditures in OECD countries: Do government ideology and electoral motives matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 797-810, December.
    2. Bortolotti, Bernardo & Cambini, Carlo & Rondi, Laura, 2012. "Reluctant Regulation," MPRA Paper 48073, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Vincenzo Bove & Roberto Nisticò, 2014. "Coups d’état and defense spending: a counterfactual analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 321-344, December.
    4. Töngür, Ünal & Hsu, Sara & Elveren, Adem Yavuz, 2015. "Military expenditures and political regimes: Evidence from global data, 1963–2000," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 68-79.
    5. Kotera, Go & Okada, Keisuke, 2015. "How Does Democratization Affect the Composition of Government Expenditure?," MPRA Paper 67085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Bove Vincenzo & Elia Leandro, 2014. "The impact of American and British involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq on health spending, military spending and economic growth," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-15, January.
    7. Vincenzo Bove & Georgios Efthyvoulou & Antonio Navas, 2013. "Political Cycles in Public Expenditure: Butter vs Guns," Working Papers 2013016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    8. Bove, Vincenzo & Nisticò, Roberto, 2014. "Military in politics and budgetary allocations," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 1065-1078.
    9. Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Political cycles and economic performance in OECD countries: empirical evidence from 1951–2006," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(1), pages 155-179, January.
    10. Vincenzo Bove & Jennifer Brauner, 2016. "The demand for military expenditure in authoritarian regimes," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(5), pages 609-625, September.
    11. Kimbambu Tsasa Vangu, Jean - Paul, 2012. "Analyse de la Relation Guerres Civiles et Croissance Économique
      [Civil Wars and Economic Growth in DRC]
      ," MPRA Paper 42424, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Feb 2012.
    12. Bjørnskov, Christian & Potrafke, Niklas, 2012. "Political ideology and economic freedom across Canadian provinces," Munich Reprints in Economics 20277, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    13. Niklas Potrafke, 2010. "Ideology and cultural policy," TWI Research Paper Series 49, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
    14. Unal Tongur & Sara Hsu & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2013. "Military Expenditures and Political Regimes: An Analysis Using Global Data, 1963-2001," ERC Working Papers 1307, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jul 2013.
    15. Kotera, Go & Okada, Keisuke, 2017. "How does democratization affect the composition of government expenditure?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 145-159.
    16. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
    17. Mai'a K. Davis Cross & Ireneusz Pawel Karolewski & Kaija Schilde, 2017. "European Military Capabilities: Enablers and Constraints on EU Power?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 37-53, January.

Articles

  1. Albalate, Daniel & Bel, Germà & Elias, Ferran, 2012. "Institutional determinants of military spending," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 279-290.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2017-10-29. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2017-10-29. Author is listed
  3. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2009-10-17. Author is listed
  4. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2009-10-17. Author is listed
  5. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2017-10-29. Author is listed

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