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Military expenditures and political regimes: Evidence from global data, 1963–2000

Listed author(s):
  • Töngür, Ünal
  • Hsu, Sara
  • Elveren, Adem Yavuz

This paper examines the determinants of military expenditures with a special focus on political regimes for more than 130 countries for the period of 1963–2000 by employing a dynamic panel data analysis. The paper aims at contributing to the literature by utilizing a recently constructed political regime data set and controlling for income inequality, a key variable that has not received substantial attention in the context of political regimes, economic growth and military expenditures. Covering a large set of countries and an extended time period, the paper reveals further evidence on the linkage between democracy and military expenditures.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999314003599
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 44 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 68-79

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:44:y:2015:i:c:p:68-79
DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2014.10.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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