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Central government's infrastructure investment across Chinese regions: A dynamic spatial panel data approach

  • Zheng, Xinye
  • Li, Fanghua
  • Song, Shunfeng
  • Yu, Yihua

This study employs spatial panel techniques to examine determinants of regional allocation of infrastructure investment made by the central government. Using a sample of 31 Chinese provinces over the 2001–2008 period, we derived four major empirical findings. First, there exist substantial spatial interactions of central government's investment across regions. Second, the central investment exhibits a highly persistent effect. Third, the central government attempts to balance equity and efficiency in its decision-making. Last, the political factor plays a significant role in the regional infrastructure investment.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043951X13000023
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 27 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 264-276

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:27:y:2013:i:c:p:264-276
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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