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Human capital mobility and convergence : a spatial dynamic panel model of the German regions

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  • Kubis, Alexander

    () (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany])

  • Schneider, Lutz

Abstract

"Since the fall of the iron curtain in 1989, the migration deficit of the Eastern part of Germany has accumulated to 1.8 million people, which is over 10 percent of its initial population. Depending on their human capital endowment, these migrants might either - in the case of low-skilled migration - accelerate or - in high-skilled case - impede convergence. Due to the availability of detailed data on regional human capital, migration and productivity growth, we are able to test how geographic mobility affects convergence via the human capital selectivity of migration. With regard to the endogeneity of the migration flows and human capital, we apply a dynamic panel data model within the framework of ß-convergence and account for spatial dependence. The regressions indicate a positive, robust, but modest effect of a migration surplus on regional productivity growth. After controlling for human capital, the effect of migration decreases; this decrease indicates that skill selectivity is one way that migration impacts growth." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en))

Suggested Citation

  • Kubis, Alexander & Schneider, Lutz, 2012. "Human capital mobility and convergence : a spatial dynamic panel model of the German regions," IAB Discussion Paper 201223, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabdpa:201223
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    Cited by:

    1. Diana Alexa & Monica Pop-Silaghi & Laura Mariana Cismaṣ, 2016. "Total Factor Productivity, Health and Spatial Dependence in Some European Regions," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 58(3), pages 387-408, September.
    2. Jonathan Eberle & Thomas Brenner, 2016. "More bucks, more growth, more justice? The effects of regional structural funds on regional economic growth and convergence in Germany," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2016-01, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    3. Meyer, Kevin Michael, 2017. "Three essays on environmental and resource economics," ISU General Staff Papers 201701010800006585, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    Binnenwanderung; Qualifikationsniveau; regionale Disparität; Konvergenz; Zuwanderung; Abwanderung; Ostdeutschland; Westdeutschland; Bundesrepublik Deutschland;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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