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How do Regulated and Unregulated Labor Markets Respond to Shocks? Evidence from Immigrants During the Great Recession

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  • Sergei Guriev
  • Biagio Speciale
  • Michele Tuccio

Abstract

We study wage adjustment during the recent crisis in Italy using a unique dataset on immigrant workers that includes those employed in formal and informal sector. We find that before the crisis immigrants’ wages in the formal and informal sectors moved in parallel (with a 15% premium in the formal labor market). During the crisis, however, formal wages did not adjust down while wages in the unregulated informal labor market fell so that by 2013 the gap had grown to 32%. The difference was particularly salient for workers in occupations where the minimum wage is likely to be binding, and in “simple” occupations where there is high substitutability between immigrant and native workers. Calibrating a simple partial equilibrium model of spillovers between formal and informal markets, we find that less than 10% of workers who lost a formal job during the crisis move to the informal sector. We also find that if the formal sector wages were fully flexible, the decline in formal employment would be in the range of 1.5–4.5%—much lower than 16% decline that we observe in the data. (JEL E24, E26, J31, J61)

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  • Sergei Guriev & Biagio Speciale & Michele Tuccio, 2019. "How do Regulated and Unregulated Labor Markets Respond to Shocks? Evidence from Immigrants During the Great Recession," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(1), pages 37-76.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jleorg:v:35:y:2019:i:1:p:37-76.
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    Cited by:

    1. de Ridder, M. & Pfajfar, D., 2017. "Policy Shocks and Wage Rigidities: Empirical Evidence from Regional Effects of National Shocks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1717, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Chletsos, Michael & Roupakias, Stelios, 2018. "Immigration and far-right voting: Evidence from Greece," MPRA Paper 88545, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Fabio Berton & Sauro Mocetti & Andrea F. Presbitero & Matteo Richiardi, 2018. "Banks, Firms, and Jobs," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 31(6), pages 2113-2156.
    4. repec:cdf:wpaper:2019/16 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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