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Worker Absence and Productivity: Evidence from Teaching

  • Mariesa A. Herrmann
  • Jonah E. Rockoff
Registered author(s):

    A significant amount of work time is lost each year due to worker absence, but evidence on the productivity losses from absenteeism remains scant due to difficulties with identification. We use uniquely detailed data on the timing, duration, and cause of absences among teachers to address many of the potential biases from the endogeneity of worker absence. Our analysis indicates that worker absences have large negative impacts: the expected loss in daily productivity from employing a temporary substitute is on par with replacing a regular worker of average productivity with one at the 10th-20th percentile of productivity.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/666537
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/666537
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

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    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 749 - 782

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/666537
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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