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School District Leave Policies, Teacher Absenteeism, and Student Achievement

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  • Ronald G. Ehrenberg
  • Randy A. Ehrenberg
  • Daniel I. Rees
  • REric L. Ehrenberg

Abstract

This paper addresses how provisions that address leave usage in teacher contracts influence teacher absences from the classroom, how teacher absences influence student absenteeism, and how teacher and student absenteeism influence student test score performance. Based on an extensive data collection effort conducted by the authors, it presents an econometric analysis using data from over 700 school districts in New York State in 1986-87. It concludes that changing some provisions (e.g., increasing the number of unused leave days teachers can cumulate and "cash in" at retirement) may simultaneously benefit teachers, students, and taxpayers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Randy A. Ehrenberg & Daniel I. Rees & REric L. Ehrenberg, 1991. "School District Leave Policies, Teacher Absenteeism, and Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 72-105.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:26:y:1991:i:1:p:72-105
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kiesling, Herbert J., 1984. "Assignment practices and the relationship of instructional time to the reading performance of elementary school children," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 341-350, August.
    2. Link, Charles R. & Mulligan, James G., 1986. "The merits of a longer school day," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 373-381, August.
    3. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Richard P. Chaykowski & Randy A. Ehrenberg, 1988. "Determinants of the Compensation and Mobility of School Superintendents," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(3), pages 386-401, April.
    4. Levin, Henry M. & Tsang, Mun C., 1987. "The economics of student time," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 357-364, August.
    5. Stephen L. Jacobson, 1989. "The Effects of Pay Incentives on Teacher Absenteeism," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(2), pages 280-286.
    6. Steven G. Allen, 1983. "How Much Does Absenteeism Cost?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(3), pages 379-393.
    7. Chelius, James R., 1981. "Understanding absenteeism: The potential contribution of economic theory," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 409-418, December.
    8. Allen, Steven G, 1981. "An Empirical Model of Work Attendance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(1), pages 77-87, February.
    9. Summers, Anita A & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1977. "Do Schools Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 639-652, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:mpr:mprres:6273 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
    3. Brian A. Jacob, 2013. "The Effect of Employment Protection on Teacher Effort," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(4), pages 727-761.
    4. Jishnu Das & Stefan Dercon & James Habyarimana & Pramila Krishnan, 2007. "Teacher Shocks and Student Learning: Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(4).

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