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Multi-state models for clustered duration data: an application to workplace effects on individual sickness absenteeism

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  • Lindeboom, Maarten

    (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculteit der Economische Wetenschappen en Econometrie (Free University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics Sciences, Business Administration and Economitrics)

  • Kerkhofs, Marcel

Abstract

In this paper we specify and estimate three state duration models of work, sickness and exit from the job to explain individual absenteeism behaviour of primary school teachers. There is a large variation of sickness absenteeism records across schools and absenteeism records of workers within a school appear to be related. This clustering of individual absenteeism data may to a large extend be caused by workplace effects. Since it will be difficult to fully capture workplace effects with observed characteristics of the workplace, we also account for unobserved workplace effects in the models. The most flexible specification allows for non-parametric baseline hazards that differ per exit rate and workplace. A stratified partial likelihood approach is used to estimate the regression coefficients of this model. Conditional on these estimates we recover fixed unobserved workplace effects and semi-parametric baseline hazards in order to detect the causes for the observed variation and clustering in the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindeboom, Maarten & Kerkhofs, Marcel, 1998. "Multi-state models for clustered duration data: an application to workplace effects on individual sickness absenteeism," Serie Research Memoranda 0008, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vua:wpaper:1998-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ham, John C & LaLonde, Robert J, 1996. "The Effect of Sample Selection and Initial Conditions in Duration Models: Evidence from Experimental Data on Training," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(1), pages 175-205, January.
    2. Gritz, R. Mark, 1993. "The impact of training on the frequency and duration of employment," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1-3), pages 21-51.
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    Cited by:

    1. Picchio, Matteo, 2012. "Lagged duration dependence in mixed proportional hazard models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 108-110.
    2. Laurent Gobillon & Carine Milcent, 2013. "Spatial disparities in hospital performance," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(6), pages 1013-1040, November.
    3. Andrén, Daniela, 2004. "Why Are The Sickness Absences So Long In Sweden," Working Papers in Economics 137, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    4. Andrén, Daniela, 2008. ""To array a man's will against his sickness is the supreme art of medicine". An analysis of multiple spells of sickness," Working Papers in Economics 294, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Laurent Gobillon & Carine Milcent, 2008. "Regional disparities in mortality by heart attack: evidence from France," Working Papers halshs-00586837, HAL.
    6. Herrmann, Mariesa A. & Rockoff, Jonah E., 2013. "Do menstrual problems explain gender gaps in absenteeism and earnings?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 12-22.
    7. Lindgren, Karl-Oskar, 2012. "Workplace size and sickness absence transitions," Working Paper Series 2012:26, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00879787 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2007. "Are Teacher Absences Worth Worrying About in the U.S.?," NBER Working Papers 13648, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Mariesa A. Herrmann & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2012. "Worker Absence and Productivity: Evidence from Teaching," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(4), pages 749-782.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multi-state duration models; clustered duration data; fixed effects; Concentrated likelihood; stratified Partial Likelihood; Sickness Absenteeism .;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

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