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Constrained Job Matching: Does Teacher Job Search Harm Disadvantaged Urban Schools?

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  • Eric Hanushek

    () (Hoover Institue, Stanford University)

  • Steven Rivkin

    (Amherst College
    National Bureau of Economic Research
    University of Texas at Dallas)

Abstract

Search theory suggests that early career job changes lead to better matches that benefit both workers and firms, but this may not hold in teacher labor markets characterized by salary rigidities, barriers to entry, and substantial differences in working conditions. Of particular concern to education policy makers is the possibility that teacher turnover adversely affects the quality of instruction in schools serving predominantly disadvantaged children. Although such schools experience higher turnover on average than others, the impact on the quality of instruction depends crucially on whether it is the more productive teachers who are more likely to depart. The absence of direct measures of productivity typically hinders efforts to measure the effect of turnover on worker quality. In the case of teachers, however, the availability of matched panel data of students and teachers enables the isolation of the contributions of teachers to achievement. The empirical analysis reveals that teachers who remain in their school tend to outperform those who leave, particularly those who exit the Texas public schools entirely. Moreover, this gap appears to be larger for schools serving predominantly low income students, evidence that high turnover is not nearly as damaging as many suggest.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Hanushek & Steven Rivkin, 2010. "Constrained Job Matching: Does Teacher Job Search Harm Disadvantaged Urban Schools?," Discussion Papers 09-011, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sip:dpaper:09-011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marchand, Joseph & Weber, Jeremy, 2017. "The Local Effects of the Texas Shale Boom on Schools, Students, and Teachers," Working Papers 2017-12, University of Alberta, Department of Economics, revised 26 Jan 2018.
    2. Matthew Ronfeldt & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2011. "How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 17176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Stephen Gibbons & Vincenzo Scrutinio & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2018. "Teacher Turnover: Does it Matter for Pupil Achievement?," CEP Discussion Papers dp1530, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Marine de Talancé, 2015. "Better Teachers, Better Results? Evidence from Rural Pakistan," Working Papers DT/2015/21, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    5. Steele, Jennifer L. & Pepper, Matthew J. & Springer, Matthew G. & Lockwood, J.R., 2015. "The distribution and mobility of effective teachers: Evidence from a large, urban school district," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 86-101.
    6. repec:tpr:edfpol:v:12:y:2017:i:3:p:396-418 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. João Firmino & Luís Catela Nunes & Ana Balcão Reis & Carmo Seabra, 2018. "Class composition and student achievement: Evidence from Portugal," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp624, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    8. Allison Atteberry & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2013. "Do First Impressions Matter? Improvement in Early Career Teacher Effectiveness," NBER Working Papers 19096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Eric A. Hanushek & Steven G. Rivkin, 2010. "The Quality and Distribution of Teachers under the No Child Left Behind Act," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 133-150, Summer.
    10. Hanushek, Eric A., 2011. "The economic value of higher teacher quality," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 466-479, June.
    11. Chingos, Matthew M. & West, Martin R., 2011. "Promotion and reassignment in public school districts: How do schools respond to differences in teacher effectiveness?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 419-433, June.
    12. Stephen Gibbons & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2016. "Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(4), pages 548-575, August.
    13. Steven Glazerman & Jeffrey Max, 2011. "Do Low-Income Students have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers? (Technical Appendix)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ff5f30f9718f4bcd824b02893, Mathematica Policy Research.
    14. Barbieri, Gianna & Rossetti, Claudio & Sestito, Paolo, 2011. "The determinants of teacher mobility: Evidence using Italian teachers’ transfer applications," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1430-1444.
    15. Eric A. Hanushek & Steven G. Rivkin, 2010. "Generalizations about Using Value-Added Measures of Teacher Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 267-271, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    teacher turnover;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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