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Determinants of Infant Mortality in Older ASEAN Economies

Author

Listed:
  • Thirunaukarasu Subramaniam

    () (University of Malaya)

  • Nanthakumar Loganathan

    () (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia)

  • Erez Yerushalmi

    () (University of Warwick)

  • Evelyn Shyamala Devadason

    () (University of Malaya)

  • Mazlan Majid

    () (University of Malaya)

Abstract

Abstract Infant mortality in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has been declining, yet disparities remain between the nations. This paper therefore explores the determinants of infant mortality in the older ASEAN-4 economies, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines using an Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Error Correction Model framework. The key findings of the study are: First, there is evidence of long-run relationships among infant mortality, education, female fertility, income and access to healthcare. Second, the determinants of infant mortality vary between countries. Female fertility emerged as the main determinant of infant mortality in Malaysia, while access to healthcare matter for infant mortality in Indonesia, and to a lesser extent for the Philippines. The income effect is significant for reducing infant mortality in Malaysia, while female education is important for Indonesia and Thailand. Third, the speed of adjustment of infant mortality rate is comparatively low in ASEAN-4.

Suggested Citation

  • Thirunaukarasu Subramaniam & Nanthakumar Loganathan & Erez Yerushalmi & Evelyn Shyamala Devadason & Mazlan Majid, 2018. "Determinants of Infant Mortality in Older ASEAN Economies," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 136(1), pages 397-415, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:136:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1526-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-016-1526-8
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