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Factors affecting infant mortality rates: evidence from cross-sectional data

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  • Mohammed Zakir
  • Phanindra Wunnava

Abstract

This paper empirically tests for factors affecting infant mortality rates. Based on a crosssectional model (covering 117 countries for the year 1993) that corrects for heteroscedasticity, the results show that fertility rates, female participation in the labour force, per capita GNP, and female literacy rates significantly affect infant mortality rates. Surprisingly, government expenditure on health-care, as a percentage of GNP, does not play a major role in determining infant mortality rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammed Zakir & Phanindra Wunnava, 1999. "Factors affecting infant mortality rates: evidence from cross-sectional data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(5), pages 271-273.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:6:y:1999:i:5:p:271-273
    DOI: 10.1080/135048599353203
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. McCord, Gordon C. & Conley, Dalton & Sachs, Jeffrey D., 2017. "Malaria ecology, child mortality & fertility," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 1-17.
    2. Yaroslava Babych, 2017. "The International Spillover Effects of Political Transitions," Working Papers 009-17, International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.
    3. Zuzana Janko & Janusz Kokoszewski, 2013. "An Intervention Time Series Analysis: Specialization and Competitiveness in Sports”," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2177-2190.
    4. Bousmah, Marwân-al-Qays & Ventelou, Bruno & Abu-Zaineh, Mohammad, 2016. "Medicine and democracy: The importance of institutional quality in the relationship between health expenditure and health outcomes in the MENA region," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(8), pages 928-935.
    5. Mohamed, Elwasila, 2018. "Bounds Test Cointegration Approach to Examine Factors Contributing to Declining Maternal Mortality Ratio in Sudan (1969-2015)," MPRA Paper 84952, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. AfDB AfDB, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 2304, African Development Bank.
    7. Weichun Chen & Judith A. Clarke & Nilanjana Roy, 2014. "Health and wealth: Short panel Granger causality tests for developing countries," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 755-784, September.
    8. Jennifer Franz & Felix R. FitzRoy, 2005. "Child mortaility, poverty and environment in developing countries," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 200518, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews.
    9. Dalton Conley & Gordon C. McCord & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2007. "Africa's Lagging Demographic Transition: Evidence from Exogenous Impacts of Malaria Ecology and Agricultural Technology," NBER Working Papers 12892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. repec:spr:soinre:v:136:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1526-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Carl Grekou & Romain Perez, 2014. "Child Mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: Why Public Health Spending Matters," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-28, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    12. Marwa Farag & A. Nandakumar & Stanley Wallack & Dominic Hodgkin & Gary Gaumer & Can Erbil, 2013. "Health expenditures, health outcomes and the role of good governance," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 33-52, March.
    13. Pradhan, Menno & Sahn, David E. & Younger, Stephen D., 2003. "Decomposing world health inequality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 271-293, March.
    14. AfDB AfDB, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 2224, African Development Bank.
    15. Amin,Mohammad & Islam,Asif Mohammed & Lopez Claros,Augusto, 2016. "Absent laws and missing women: can domestic violence legislation reduce female mortality ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7622, The World Bank.
    16. Syeda Hassan & Khalid Zaman & Sajid Zaman & Muhammad Shabir, 2014. "Measuring health expenditures and outcomes in saarc region: health is a luxury?," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1421-1437, May.

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