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Infant mortality in Armenia, 1992-2003

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  • Hakobyan, Mihran
  • Mkrtchyan, Ararat
  • Yepiskoposyan, Levon

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  • Hakobyan, Mihran & Mkrtchyan, Ararat & Yepiskoposyan, Levon, 2006. "Infant mortality in Armenia, 1992-2003," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 351-358, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:4:y:2006:i:3:p:351-358
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hertz, Erica & Hebert, James R. & Landon, Joan, 1994. "Social and environmental factors and life expectancy, infant mortality, and maternal mortality rates: Results of a cross-national comparison," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 105-114, July.
    2. Bicego, George T. & Ties Boerma, J., 1993. "Maternal education and child survival: A comparative study of survey data from 17 countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1207-1227, May.
    3. Robert J. Waldmann, 1992. "Income Distribution and Infant Mortality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1283-1302.
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