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Social and environmental factors and life expectancy, infant mortality, and maternal mortality rates: Results of a cross-national comparison

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  • Hertz, Erica
  • Hebert, James R.
  • Landon, Joan

Abstract

Using data from United Nations sources we conducted an international comparison study of infant and maternal mortality rates and life expectancy at birth. We examined these three dependent variables in relation to a range of independent variables including dietary factors, medical resource availability, gross national product (GNP/capital), literacy rates, growth in the labor force, and provision of sanitation facilities and safe water. Based on exploratory stepwise regression models, we fitted a series of general linear models for each of the three dependent variables. For the models with the highest explanatory ability, the percent of households without sanitation facilities showed the strongest association with all three dependent variables: life expectancy at birth (R2 = 0.83, B = -0.088, P = 0.0007); infant mortality rate (R2 = 0.87, B = +0.611, P

Suggested Citation

  • Hertz, Erica & Hebert, James R. & Landon, Joan, 1994. "Social and environmental factors and life expectancy, infant mortality, and maternal mortality rates: Results of a cross-national comparison," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 105-114, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:39:y:1994:i:1:p:105-114
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    Cited by:

    1. Yaroslava Babych, 2017. "The International Spillover Effects of Political Transitions," Working Papers 009-17, International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.
    2. Roll, Kathrin, 2012. "The influence of regional health care structures on delay in diagnosis of rare diseases: The case of Marfan Syndrome," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(2), pages 119-127.
    3. repec:eee:socmed:v:194:y:2017:i:c:p:87-95 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Charles Kenny, 2009. "There's more to life than money: Exploring the levels|growth paradox in income and health," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 24-41.
    5. David Pottebaum & Ravi Kanbur, 2004. "Civil war, public goods and the social wealth of nations," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 459-484.
    6. Evans,David & Goldstein,Markus P. & Popova,Anna, 2015. "The next wave of deaths from Ebola ? the impact of health care worker mortality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7344, The World Bank.
    7. Pablo Villalobos Dintrans & Claire Chaumont, 2017. "Examining the relationship between human resources and mortality: the effects of methodological choices," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(3), pages 361-370, April.
    8. Liebert, H. & Mäder, B., 2016. "Marginal effects of physician coverage on infant and disease mortality," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/17, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Hakobyan, Mihran & Mkrtchyan, Ararat & Yepiskoposyan, Levon, 2006. "Infant mortality in Armenia, 1992-2003," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 351-358, December.
    10. Liebert, Helge & Mäder, Beatrice, 2017. "The impact of regional health care coverage on infant mortality and disease incidence," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168103, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. repec:eee:socmed:v:196:y:2018:i:c:p:96-105 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ya-Hui Huang & Chien-Chiang Lee & Chun-Ping Chang, 2016. "Medical Personnel and Life Expectancy: New Evidence from Taiwan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 1425-1447, September.
    13. Arno Tausch & Almas Heshmati, 2013. "Worker remittances and the global preconditions of ‘smart development’," Society and Economy, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 35(1), pages 25-50, April.
    14. Muhammad Shahbaz & Nanthakumar Loganathan & Nooreen Mujahid & Amjad Ali & Ahmed Nawaz, 2016. "Determinants of Life Expectancy and its Prospects Under the Role of Economic Misery: A Case of Pakistan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 1299-1316, April.
    15. Arno Tausch & Almas Heshmati, 2012. "Migration, Openness and the Global Preconditions of "Smart Development"," Bogazici Journal, Review of Social, Economic and Administrative Studies, Bogazici University, Department of Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 1-62.
    16. Poudyal, Neelam C. & Hodges, Donald G. & Bowker, J.M. & Cordell, H.K., 2009. "Evaluating natural resource amenities in a human life expectancy production function," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 253-259, July.
    17. Liebert, Helge & Mäder, Beatrice, 2016. "The impact of regional health care coverage on infant mortality and disease incidence," Economics Working Paper Series 1620, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    18. Casabonne, Ursula & Kenny, Charles, 2012. "The Best Things in Life are (Nearly) Free: Technology, Knowledge, and Global Health," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 21-35.
    19. Audi, Marc & Ali, Amjad, 2016. "Socio-Economic Status and Life Expectancy in Lebanon: An Empirical Analysis," MPRA Paper 72900, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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