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Complementarity between heterogeneous human capital and R&D: can job-training avoid low development traps?

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  • Sergio Scicchitano

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Abstract

This paper uses a non-overlapping generations model of endogenous growth to describe the effect of human capital’s heterogeneity on economic growth. In the model, workers can accumulate human capital not only through education, but also through on-the-job training (j-t); enterpreneurs can invest in R&D and can offer training. We model two different typologies of training. The first, technology-general (T-GT), is offered even without R&D and to all workers; the second one, technologyspecific T-S T), is joined to the success of innovative activity and provided just to those workers engaged in research. The paper, by extending Redding (1996), demonstrates that human capital composition, which is often neglected in endogenous growth models, is important in determining the probability of innovation occurring and the economy’s rate of growth. In particular, it shows that complementarities between different types of human capital investment are important. Moreover, training causes a multiplicity of equilibria in education investment and rate of growth, and technology-general training avoids low development traps when R&D is absent.
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Suggested Citation

  • Sergio Scicchitano, 2010. "Complementarity between heterogeneous human capital and R&D: can job-training avoid low development traps?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 361-380, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:37:y:2010:i:4:p:361-380
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-009-9113-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adriaan Zon & Roberto Antonietti, 2016. "Education and training in a model of endogenous growth with creative wear-and-tear," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(1), pages 35-62, April.
    2. Sergio Scicchitano, 2007. "On the complementarity between on-the-job training and R&D: a brief overview," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(2), pages 1-11.
    3. Hector Sala & José Silva, 2013. "Labor productivity and vocational training: evidence from Europe," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 31-41, August.
    4. Uwe Cantner & Wolfgang Gerstlberger & Ipsita Roy, 2014. "Works Councils, Training Activities and Innovation: A Study of German Firms," Jena Economic Research Papers 2014-006, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    5. R. Antonietti, 2006. "The skill content of technological change. Some conjectures on the role of education and job-training in reducing the timing of new technology adoption," Working Papers 556, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. Cooke, Stephen C. & Kulandaisamy, Bharathkumar A., 2010. "Wage Divergence between the Rocky Mountain States and the U.S.: Idaho Measures and Sources, 2001-2009," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 99-124.
    7. Luigi Reggi & Sergio Scicchitano, 2011. "European Regions Financing Public e-Services: the Case of EU Structural Funds," Working Papers 1110, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2011.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    General versus specific training; Innovation; Heterogeneous human capital; Endogenous growth; I2; J24; J31; O3; O40;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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