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On the complementarity between on-the-job training and R&D: a brief overview

  • Sergio Scicchitano

    ()

    (Italian Ministry of Economic Development, "La Sapienza" University and University of Calabria)

In this paper I briefly review the existing literature on the complementarity between on-the-job training and R&D. I show that the complementarity is studied, on the one hand, within two lines of economic research, labour economics and endogenous growth. On the other hand, from the empirical point of view, some recent papers seem to confirm results of theoretical studies, by arguing that a specific training for R&D is quite often a crucial condition for adopting new technologies. I conclude that this issue is treated by different subsets of economic literature which need other improvements, and particularly, an integration

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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 15 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 1-11

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07o00002
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  1. Jerik Hanushek & Dennis Kimko, 2006. "Schooling, Labor-force Quality, and the Growth of Nations," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 1, pages 154-193.
  2. Acemoglu, Daron, 1997. "Training and Innovation in an Imperfect Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 445-64, July.
  3. Peter J. Klenow & Mark Bils, 2000. "Does Schooling Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1160-1183, December.
  4. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
  5. Daron Acemoglu & Joern-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," Working papers 98-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  6. Hashimoto, Masanori, 1981. "Firm-Specific Human Capital as a Shared Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 475-82, June.
  7. Duffy, John & Papageorgiou, Chris, 2000. " A Cross-Country Empirical Investigation of the Aggregate Production Function Specification," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 87-120, March.
  8. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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