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Estimating the Social Return on Schooling

In: Proceedings of the Conference on Human and Economic Resources

  • Marcelo Soto

    (Instituto de Análisis Económico)

A number of papers .nd that changes in schooling are not correlated with changes in per capita income. Two non-competing interpretations that have been given are that the social return on schooling is close to zero and the measurement error of changes in schooling is high. This paper shows that the lack of significance of schooling is threefold. First, there is a problem of a proper definition of the way in which years of schooling should enter in a production function. Second, collinearity between physical and human capital stocks seriously undermines the ability of educational indicators to display any significance in panel data estimates. And third, failure to cope with measurement error and endogeneity produces biased estimates. As opposed to the earlier empirical literature, the social return of schooling is positive and significant, but no Lucas-type externalities are observed.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Oguz Esen & Ayla Ogus (ed.), 2006. "Proceedings of the International Conference on Human and Economic Resources," Proceedings of the IUE-SUNY Cortland Conference in Economics, Izmir University of Economics, number 2006, 08.
  • This item is provided by Izmir University of Economics in its series Papers of the Annual IUE-SUNY Cortland Conference in Economics with number 200605.
    Handle: RePEc:izm:prcdng:200605
    Contact details of provider: Fax: (90) 232 279 2626
    Web page: http://eco.ieu.edu.tr

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    12. Douglas Gollin, 2001. "Getting Income Shares Right," Department of Economics Working Papers 2001-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    13. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. " Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-89, September.
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