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Resilience amidst conflict? The effect of civil war exposure on secondary education

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  • Silwal, Shikha

Abstract

I use education and conflict data from Nepal to examine the effect of exposure to violence on students at secondary schooling level and highlight patterns of recovery in the post-conflict period. This study extends our understanding of the effects of civil unrest on both quantity and quality of schooling by analyzing the effects during the periods of unrest and immediately following the end of the conflict. I find a substantial negative impact of exposure to violence on the secondary schooling. Some adverse effects rebounded 3-5 years after the conflict ended; however, notable gaps in academic performance between high-violence areas and low-violence areas has persisted and girls continue to dropout at higher rates. These results indicate that an armed conflict within a country has specific and far-reaching consequences for a warring state’s young population and next generation, in addition to the well-established more immediate effects of violence.

Suggested Citation

  • Silwal, Shikha, 2016. "Resilience amidst conflict? The effect of civil war exposure on secondary education," International Journal of Development and Conflict, Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, vol. 6(2), pages 97-120.
  • Handle: RePEc:gok:ijdcv1:v:6:y:2016:i:2:p:97-120
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    1. repec:epc:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:5-9 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; Human Capital; Post-Conflict Recovery; Nepal;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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