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The Distribution Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Intensity across Chinese Provinces: A Weighted Approach

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  • Jian-Xin Wu

    () (School of Economics, Institute of Resource, Environment and Sustainable Development Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China)

  • Ling-Yun He

    () (School of Economics, Institute of Resource, Environment and Sustainable Development Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
    School of Economics and Management, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Abstract

This paper examines the distribution dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions intensity across 30 Chinese provinces using a weighted distribution dynamics approach. The results show that CO 2 emissions intensity tends to diverge during the sample period of 1995–2014. However, convergence clubs are found in the ergodic distributions of the full sample and two sub-sample periods. Divergence, polarization, and stratification are the dominant characteristics in the distribution dynamics. Weightings with economic and population sizes have important impacts on current distributions and hence long-run steady distributions. Neglecting the size of the economy may underestimate the deterioration in the long-run steady state. The result also shows that conditioning on space and income cannot eliminate the multimodality in the long-run distribution. However, capital intensity has an important impact on the formation of convergence clubs. Our findings will contribute to an understanding of the spatial dynamic behaviors of CO 2 emissions across Chinese provinces, and have important policy implications for CO 2 emissions reduction in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Jian-Xin Wu & Ling-Yun He, 2017. "The Distribution Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Intensity across Chinese Provinces: A Weighted Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:1:p:101-:d:87640
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    carbon dioxide emissions; weighted kernel estimation; distribution dynamics; conditional distribution; Chinese provinces;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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