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Government Policy Responses to Financial Crises: Identifying Patterns and Policy Origins in Developing Countries

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  • Ha, Eunyoung
  • Kang, Myung-koo

Abstract

This paper investigates how three major political conditions—political constraint (imposed by veto players), government partisanship, and elections—have influenced the government responses to financial crises in 98 developing countries over the period 1976–2004. We find that governments experiencing financial crises generally tightened their monetary and fiscal policies, but the extent of the tightening was considerably moderated by the presence of large political constraint (large and strong veto players), strong leftist partisan power in government, and upcoming legislative or presidential elections. We also find that fiscal policies are more considerably constrained by political conditions than monetary policies.

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  • Ha, Eunyoung & Kang, Myung-koo, 2015. "Government Policy Responses to Financial Crises: Identifying Patterns and Policy Origins in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 264-281.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:68:y:2015:i:c:p:264-281
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.12.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Markus Leibrecht & Johann Scharler, 2017. "Financial Crises and the Composition of Public Finances: Evidence from OECD Countries," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2017-04, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Blanton, Robert G. & Blanton, Shannon Lindsey & Peksen, Dursun, 2015. "Financial Crises and Labor: Does Tight Money Loosen Labor Rights?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Christopher Gandrud & Mark Hallerberg, 2015. "What is a Financial Crisis? Efficiently Measuring Real-Time Perceptions of Financial Market Stress with an Application to Financial Crisis Budget Cycles," CESifo Working Paper Series 5632, CESifo.
    4. Colombo, Emilio & Menna, Lorenzo & Tirelli, Patrizio, 2019. "Informality and the labor market effects of financial crises," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 1-22.
    5. Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph & Debrah, Yaw A. & Honyenuga, Ben Q. & Adzoyi, Paulina N., 2017. "Business and government interdependence in emerging economies: Insights from hotels in Ghana," MPRA Paper 81320, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Pham, Hien Thuc & Carmignani, Fabrizio & Kler, Parvinder, 2018. "Thrift culture and the size of government," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 571-578.

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