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Democracy, Financial Openness, and Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Heterogeneity Across Existing Emission Levels

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  • You, Wan-Hai
  • Zhu, Hui-Ming
  • Yu, Keming
  • Peng, Cheng

Abstract

The determinants of CO2 emissions have attracted many researchers over the past few decades. Most of studies, however, ignore the possibility that effect of independent variables on CO2 emissions could vary throughout the CO2 emission distribution. We address this issue by applying quantile regression methods. We examine whether greater democracy and more financial openness consistently reduce emissions among the most and least emission nations. Our results show that the effect of democracy on CO2 emissions is heterogeneous across quantiles. Among the most emissions nations, greater democracy appears to reduce emissions, but more financial openness does not appear to reduce it.

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  • You, Wan-Hai & Zhu, Hui-Ming & Yu, Keming & Peng, Cheng, 2015. "Democracy, Financial Openness, and Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Heterogeneity Across Existing Emission Levels," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 189-207.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:66:y:2015:i:c:p:189-207
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.08.013
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    Cited by:

    1. Lv, Zhike, 2017. "The effect of democracy on CO2 emissions in emerging countries: Does the level of income matter?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 900-906.
    2. Zhu, Huiming & Duan, Lijun & Guo, Yawei & Yu, Keming, 2016. "The effects of FDI, economic growth and energy consumption on carbon emissions in ASEAN-5: Evidence from panel quantile regression," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 237-248.
    3. Frantisek Cech & Jozef Barunik, 2017. "Measurement of Common Risk Factors: A Panel Quantile Regression Model for Returns," Papers 1708.08622, arXiv.org.
    4. Euler, Michael & Krishna, Vijesh & Schwarze, Stefan & Siregar, Hermanto & Qaim, Matin, 2017. "Oil Palm Adoption, Household Welfare, and Nutrition Among Smallholder Farmers in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 219-235.

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