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Adult employment probabilities of socially maladjusted children

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  • Sciulli, Dario

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between childhood social maladjustment and adult employment probabilities. Using data from the British National Child Development Study, we find that being socially maladjusted at age 11 has a negative effect on adult employment probabilities. Accounting for state dependence nearly doubles the negative effect of social maladjustment. Moreover, socially maladjusted individuals exhibit stronger state dependence than do socially adjusted individuals, suggesting that the former experience greater difficulties in finding a job when not employed. This finding is possibly due to the persistence of antisocial behavior and/or subsequent disadvantages associated with childhood social maladjustment. We also find that females are more penalized than males for low-middle levels of social maladjustment, while males suffer more in cases of higher levels. In addition, childhood social maladjustment is less detrimental to adult employment probabilities if cohort-members exhibit reduced antisocial behavioral aspects during adolescence. The estimation results are robust to exogeneity tests and the introduction of additional controls testing the role of school/living environment. Our findings suggest that policies aimed at improving social skills during adolescence and favoring insertion in the labor market may be effective in both improving employment prospects and achieving social inclusion of affected individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Sciulli, Dario, 2016. "Adult employment probabilities of socially maladjusted children," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 9-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:60:y:2016:i:c:p:9-22
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2015.11.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Papageorge, Nicholas W. & Ronda, Victor & Zheng, Yu, 2017. "The Economic Value of Breaking Bad: Misbehavior, Schooling and the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 10822, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social maladjustment; Employment; Child development; State dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables

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