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Early Childhood Behaviours, Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes: Estimates from a Sample of Twins

Author

Listed:
  • Anh T. Le

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Paul W. Miller

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Andrew C. Heath

    (Department of Psychiatry and Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University)

  • Nick Martin

    (Queensland Institute of Medical Research)

Abstract

This paper examines the links between childhood conduct disorder problems and schooling and labour market outcomes net of genetic and environmental effects. The results show that individuals who experienced conduct disorder problems are more likely to leave school early, have poorer employment prospects and lower earnings. These findings are shown to be due to the genetic and environmental influences that are generally not considered in studies of schooling and labour market outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller & Andrew C. Heath & Nick Martin, 2004. "Early Childhood Behaviours, Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes: Estimates from a Sample of Twins," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 04-02, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:04-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neumark, David, 1999. "Biases in twin estimates of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 143-148, April.
    2. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 37-64, October.
    3. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 2000. "Child Development and Success or Failure in the Youth Labor Market," NBER Chapters, in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 247-288, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Anh Le & Paul Miller, 2004. "School-leaving Decisions in Australia: A Cohort Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 39-65.
    5. Bound, John & Solon, Gary, 1999. "Double trouble: on the value of twins-based estimation of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 169-182, April.
    6. Jeff Borland & Anthony Suen, 1994. "The Experience‐Earnings Profile in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 70(208), pages 44-55, March.
    7. Miller, Paul W & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1995. "What Do Twins Studies Reveal about the Economic Returns to Education? A Comparison of Australian and U.S. Findings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 586-599, June.
    8. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. "Pseudo-R-[superscript 2] Measures for Some Common Limited Dependent Variable Models," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 241-259, September.
    9. Griliches, Zvi, 1976. "Wages of Very Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 69-85, August.
    10. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Childhood Behaviours; Educational Attainment; Unemployment; Employment; Wages;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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