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Early childhood behaviours, schooling and labour market outcomes: estimates from a sample of twins

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  • Le, Anh T.
  • Miller, Paul W.
  • Heath, Andrew C.
  • Martin, Nick

Abstract

This paper examines the links between childhood conduct disorder problems and schooling and labour market outcomes net of genetic and environmental effects. The results show that individuals who experienced conduct disorder problems are more likely to leave school early, have poorer employment prospects and lower earnings. These findings are shown to be due to the genetic and environmental influences that are generally not considered in studies of schooling and labour market outcomes.
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Suggested Citation

  • Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Heath, Andrew C. & Martin, Nick, 2005. "Early childhood behaviours, schooling and labour market outcomes: estimates from a sample of twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-17, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:24:y:2005:i:1:p:1-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Neumark, David, 1999. "Biases in twin estimates of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 143-148, April.
    2. Miller, Paul W & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1995. "What Do Twins Studies Reveal about the Economic Returns to Education? A Comparison of Australian and U.S. Findings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 586-599, June.
    3. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. " Pseudo-R-[superscript 2] Measures for Some Common Limited Dependent Variable Models," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 241-259, September.
    4. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 37-64, October.
    5. Griliches, Zvi, 1976. "Wages of Very Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 69-85, August.
    6. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 2000. "Child Development and Success or Failure in the Youth Labor Market," NBER Chapters,in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 247-288 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
    8. Anh Le & Paul Miller, 2004. "School-leaving Decisions in Australia: A Cohort Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 39-65.
    9. Bound, John & Solon, Gary, 1999. "Double trouble: on the value of twins-based estimation of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 169-182, April.
    10. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
    11. Borland, Jeff & Suen, Anthony, 1994. "The Experience-Earnings Profile in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 70(208), pages 44-55, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Herbst, Chris M. & Tekin, Erdal, 2010. "Child care subsidies and child development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 618-638, August.
    2. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2005. "Birth weight and schooling and earnings: estimates from a sample of twins," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 86(3), pages 387-392, March.
    3. Pierre Koning & Dinand Webbink & Nicholas Martin, 2015. "The effect of education on smoking behavior: new evidence from smoking durations of a sample of twins," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1479-1497, June.
    4. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2014. "The long-term impact of family difficulties during childhood on labor market outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 663-687, December.
    5. Dinand Webbink & Sunčica Vujić & Pierre Koning & Nicholas G. Martin, 2012. "The Effect Of Childhood Conduct Disorder On Human Capital," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 928-945, August.
    6. Deniz Gevrek & Z Eylem Gevrek & Cahit Guven, 2015. "Benefits of Education at the Intensive Margin: Childhood Academic Performance and Adult Outcomes among American Immigrants," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 298-328, June.
    7. Ponzo, Michela, 2013. "Does bullying reduce educational achievement? An evaluation using matching estimators," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1057-1078.
    8. Drydakis, Nick, 2013. "Bullying at School and Labour Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 7432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2011. "The causal effect of family difficulties during childhood on adult labour market outcomes," CEIS Research Paper 203, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 30 Jun 2011.
    10. Ammermueller, Andreas, 2012. "Violence in European schools: A widespread phenomenon that matters for educational production," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 908-922.
    11. Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Slutske, Wendy S. & Martin, Nicholas G., 2010. "Are Attitudes Towards Economic Risk Heritable? Analyses Using the Australian Twin Study of Gambling," IZA Discussion Papers 4859, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, 2005. "Bullying, Education and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Working Papers 2005015, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2005.
    13. Persson, Mattias & Svensson, Mikael, 2013. "The willingness to pay to reduce school bullying," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 1-11.
    14. Grace Chia & Paul W. Miller, 2008. "Tertiary Performance, Field of Study and Graduate Starting Salaries," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(1), pages 15-31, March.
    15. repec:spr:jopoec:v:30:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0642-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Slutske, Wendy S. & Martin, Nicholas G., 2011. "Attitudes towards economic risk and the gender pay gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 555-561, August.
    17. Dinand Webbink & Pierre Koning & Sunčica Vujić & Nicholas G. Martin, 2013. "Why Are Criminals Less Educated than Non-Criminals? Evidence from a Cohort of Young Australian Twins," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 115-144, February.
    18. Ammermüller, Andreas, 2007. "Violence in European schools: victimization and consequences," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-004, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    19. Sciulli, Dario, 2016. "Adult employment probabilities of socially maladjusted children," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 9-22.
    20. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2008. "Bullying, education and earnings: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 387-401, August.
    21. Eriksen, Tine Louise Mundbjerg & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Simonsen, Marianne, 2012. "The Effects of Bullying in Elementary School," IZA Discussion Papers 6718, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Spector, Tim D., 2013. "Does more schooling improve health outcomes and health related behaviors? Evidence from U.K. twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 134-148.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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