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The impact of natural disasters on the banking sector: Evidence from hurricane strikes in the Caribbean

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  • Brei, Michael
  • Mohan, Preeya
  • Strobl, Eric

Abstract

While natural disasters cause considerable damage and a number of studies have attempted to investigate the nature and quantify the magnitude of these losses, there is a paucity of empirical evidence on the impact on the banking sector. In this paper we construct a panel of quarterly banking data and historical losses due to hurricane strikes for islands in the Eastern Caribbean to econometrically investigate the impact of these natural disasters on the banking industry. Our results suggest that, following a hurricane strike, banks face deposit withdrawals and experience a negative funding shock to which they respond by reducing the supply of lending and by drawing on liquid assets. There are no signs of deterioration in loan defaults and bank capital. Therefore, the withdrawal and use of deposits rather than an expansion in credit appears to play a significant role in funding post hurricane recovery in the region. This points to the importance of an active reserve requirement policy.

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  • Brei, Michael & Mohan, Preeya & Strobl, Eric, 2019. "The impact of natural disasters on the banking sector: Evidence from hurricane strikes in the Caribbean," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 232-239.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:72:y:2019:i:c:p:232-239
    DOI: 10.1016/j.qref.2018.12.004
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    5. Kristian S. Blickle & Sarah Ngo Hamerling & Donald P. Morgan, 2021. "How Bad Are Weather Disasters for Banks?," Staff Reports 990, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    6. De Bandt Olivier, & Jacolin Luc, & Lemaire Thibault., 2021. "Climate Change in Developing Countries: Global Warming Effects,Transmission Channels and Adaptation Policies," Working papers 822, Banque de France.
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    8. Bayangos, Veronica B. & Cachuela, Rafael Augusto D. & Prado, Fatima Lourdes E. Del, 2021. "Impact of extreme weather episodes on the Philippine banking sector – Evidence using branch-level supervisory data," Latin American Journal of Central Banking (previously Monetaria), Elsevier, vol. 2(1).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking sector; Natural disasters; Small island economies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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