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Together or separate? Post-conflict partition, ethnic homogenization, and the provision of public schooling

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  • Swee, Eik Leong

Abstract

The partitioning of political jurisdictions is becoming an increasingly common component of agreements to end ethnic conflict, although its impact on post-conflict recovery remains unclear. This paper studies the effects of the partition which ended the 1992–1995 Bosnian War on the post-war provision of public schooling. I find that partitioned municipalities provide 58% more primary schools and 37% more teachers (per capita). Driven mainly by convergent preferences for ethnically oriented schools, however, this arrangement delivers distributional consequences: in partitioned municipalities, ethnic majority children are more likely to complete primary schooling, while for ethnic minority children it is the opposite.

Suggested Citation

  • Swee, Eik Leong, 2015. "Together or separate? Post-conflict partition, ethnic homogenization, and the provision of public schooling," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 1-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:128:y:2015:i:c:p:1-15
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2015.05.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Enrico Spolaore, 2009. "National Borders, Conflict and Peace," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0744, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    2. Francesco Cinnirella & Ruth Maria Schüler, 2016. "The Cost of Decentralization: Linguistic Polarization and the Provision of Education," CESifo Working Paper Series 5894, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Testa, Patrick A., 2018. "Education and propaganda: Tradeoffs to public education provision in nondemocracies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 66-81.
    4. Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hoang, Trung X. & Nguyen, Ha, 2018. "The Long-Run and Gender-Equalizing Impacts of School Access: Evidence from the First Indochina War," GLO Discussion Paper Series 223, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Akwasi Ampofo & Firmin Doko Tchatoka, 2019. "Reducing Public‐Private Sector Pay Differentials: The Single Spine Pay Policy As A Natural Experiment In Ghana," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(1), pages 283-315, January.
    6. Akresh, Richard & Caruso, German Daniel & Thirumurthy, Harsha, 2016. "Detailed Geographic Information, Conflict Exposure, and Health Impacts," IZA Discussion Papers 10330, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Christoph Eder, 2014. "Displacement and education of the next generation: evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
    8. Cinnirella, Francesco & Schueler, Ruth M., 2016. "The Cost of Decentralization: Linguistic Polarization and the Provision of Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 11274, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Baskaran, Thushyanthan & Blesse, Sebastian, 2019. "Subnational border reforms and economic development in Africa," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    10. Lazarev, Egor & Mironova, Vera, 2018. "The economic consequences of political alienation: Ethnic minority status and investment behavior in a post-conflict society," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 27-39.
    11. Swee, Eik Leong, 2015. "On war intensity and schooling attainment: The case of Bosnia and Herzegovina," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PA), pages 158-172.

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