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Brand death: A developmental model of senescence

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  • Ewing, Michael T.
  • Jevons, Colin P.
  • Khalil, Elias L.

Abstract

Drawing on literature underpinning brand management in marketing, product life cycles in economics, fads in sociology and aging in biology, this paper argues that brand demise is inevitable and not necessarily caused by managerial incompetence. Rather, this demise is a natural part of a brand's developmental process, instigated by consumers seeking to satisfy not only their material needs (constitutive utility), but also their self-image (symbolic utility). This paper presents a model of brand senescence to explain this phenomenon and concludes with a discussion of the implications for managerial practice and marketing theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewing, Michael T. & Jevons, Colin P. & Khalil, Elias L., 2009. "Brand death: A developmental model of senescence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 332-338, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:62:y:2009:i:3:p:332-338
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    Cited by:

    1. Huber, Frank & Meyer, Frederik & Vogel, Johannes & Weihrauch, Andrea & Hamprecht, Julia, 2013. "Endorser age and stereotypes: Consequences on brand age," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 207-215.
    2. Müller, Brigitte & Kocher, Bruno & Crettaz, Antoine, 2013. "The effects of visual rejuvenation through brand logos," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 82-88.
    3. Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2014. "Old habits die hard: A tale of two failed companies and unwanted inheritance," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(9), pages 1894-1903.
    4. Loock, Moritz & Hinnen, Gieri, 2015. "Heuristics in organizations: A review and a research agenda," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(9), pages 2027-2036.
    5. Thompson, Ann-Marie K., 2010. "Golder's historical method in research in marketing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1269-1272, December.

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