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Golder's historical method in research in marketing

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  • Thompson, Ann-Marie K.

Abstract

This article reviews a seminal article in the historical marketing literature -- "Historical Method in Marketing Research: With New Evidence on Long-Term Market Share Stability" (Golder, 2000). The present study uses citation analysis and commentary to consider the contributions of Golder (2000) to the marketing discipline. This review explores why the article is seminal and how Golder's article influences marketing historical research. Golder's article is important for two main reasons. First for its findings, which contradict commonly held beliefs about long-term market share stability, though the relevant literature largely ignores these findings. The literature does recognize Golder's (2000) second contribution of the historical method: his article offers clear guidelines to new and emerging research in historical marketing.

Suggested Citation

  • Thompson, Ann-Marie K., 2010. "Golder's historical method in research in marketing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1269-1272, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:12:p:1269-1272
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hubbard, Raymond & Vetter, Daniel E., 1996. "An empirical comparison of published replication research in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 153-164, February.
    2. Bart J. Bronnenberg & Sanjay K. Dhar & Jean-Pierre H. Dubé, 2009. "Brand History, Geography, and the Persistence of Brand Shares," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(1), pages 87-115, February.
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    6. Smith, Ruth Ann & Lux, David S, 1993. "Historical Method in Consumer Research: Developing Causal Explanations of Change," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 595-610, March.
    7. Gerard J. Tellis & Stefan Stremersch & Eden Yin, 2003. "The International Takeoff of New Products: The Role of Economics, Culture, and Country Innovativeness," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 22(2), pages 188-208, October.
    8. Raj Echambadi & Benjamin Campbell & Rajshree Agarwal, 2006. "Encouraging Best Practice in Quantitative Management Research: An Incomplete List of Opportunities," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(8), pages 1801-1820, December.
    9. Calder, Bobby J & Tybout, Alice M, 1987. "What Consumer Research Is . . ," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 136-140, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Spears, Nancy & Amos, Clinton, 2014. "Twentieth century female ad images: Cultural interconnections, social learning, and the dialectical logic of advertising," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 441-448.
    2. Pal, John & Medway, Dominic & Byrom, John, 2011. "Deconstructing the notion of blame in corporate failure," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(10), pages 1043-1051, October.

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