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Where does business research go from here? Food-for-thought on academic papers in business research

  • Geuens, Maggie
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    This essay focuses on some of the adverse practices in business research publications. First, business researchers seem to have lost touch with business practice and to narrow the target group to fellow academics only, reducing the production of useful knowledge. Second, the objectives of business research publications narrow to impact and citations. This view leads to a strict focus on path-breaking theories and a denigration of replication and qualitative studies. Third, an obsession with the .05 significance level and corroborating findings leaves researchers with full file drawers of unpublished papers and could leave journals with a high rate of type I error papers. Fourth, complex, lengthy articles, the importance of carefully crafting a story around the research and a variety of style guidelines make business researchers less productive than they could be. Finally, a blind reliance on ISI's impact and citation scores may not do justice to a researcher's real contribution.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Business Research.

    Volume (Year): 64 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 10 (October)
    Pages: 1104-1107

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:64:y:2011:i:10:p:1104-1107
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres

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    1. Ellson, Tony, 2009. "Assessing contribution of research in business to practice," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(11), pages 1160-1164, November.
    2. Evanschitzky, Heiner & Baumgarth, Carsten & Hubbard, Raymond & Armstrong, J. Scott, 2007. "Replication research's disturbing trend," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 411-415, April.
    3. U. Mohanty & S. Raman & D. Rao, 2007. "Editorial," Natural Hazards, International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 41(3), pages 379-379, June.
    4. U. Mohanty & Sethu Raman & D. Rao, 2007. "Editorial," Natural Hazards, International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 42(2), pages 253-255, August.
    5. Armstrong, J. Scott, 2003. "Discovery and communication of important marketing findings: Evidence and proposals," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 69-84, January.
    6. S. Stremersch & I. Verniers & C. Verhoef, 2006. "The Quest for Citations: Drivers of Article Impact," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 06/422, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    7. Woodside, Arch G., 2009. "Journal and author impact metrics: An editorial," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 1-4, January.
    8. Hubbard, Raymond & Vetter, Daniel E., 1996. "An empirical comparison of published replication research in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 153-164, February.
    9. Anonymous, 2007. "Editorial Board," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 36(1), April.
    10. Moussa, Salim & Touzani, Mourad, 2010. "Ranking marketing journals using the Google Scholar-based hg-index," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 107-117.
    11. Kousha, Kayvan & Thelwall, Mike & Rezaie, Somayeh, 2010. "Using the Web for research evaluation: The Integrated Online Impact indicator," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 124-135.
    12. Daniel Sutter & Rex Pjesky, 2007. "Where Would Adam Smith Publish Today? The Near Absence of Math-free Research in Top Journals," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 4(2), pages 230-240, May.
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