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An empirical investigation of the determinants of democracy: Trade, aid and the neighbor effect

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  • Csordás, Stefan
  • Ludwig, Markus

Abstract

Empirical investigation by dynamic panel data models of the determinants of democracy shows a strong positive neighbor effect. Foreign aid is stabilizing but not inducing democratic development, while there is no significant relationship to openness to trade and income.

Suggested Citation

  • Csordás, Stefan & Ludwig, Markus, 2011. "An empirical investigation of the determinants of democracy: Trade, aid and the neighbor effect," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(3), pages 235-237, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:3:p:235-237
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bougharriou, Nouha & Benayed, Walid & Gabsi, Foued Badr, 2018. "The democracy and economic growth nexus: Do FDI and government spending matter? Evidence from the Arab world," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-17, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Adam, Antonis & Karanatsis, Konstas, 2016. "Sovereign Defaults and Political Regime Transitions," MPRA Paper 69062, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Armey, Laura E. & McNab, Robert M., 2012. "Democratization and civil war," MPRA Paper 42460, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ivar Kolstad & Arne Wiig, 2014. "Diversification and democracy," CMI Working Papers 9, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    5. Zohid Askarov & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2013. "Does aid improve democracy and governance? A meta-regression analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(3), pages 601-628, December.
    6. Nouha Bougharriou & Walid Benayed & Foued Badr Gabsi, 2016. "On the determinants of democracy in the Arab World," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(59), pages 25-42, March.

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