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CO2 emissions, research and technology transfer in China

  • Ang, James B.

Although the economy of China has grown very strongly over the last few decades, this spectacular performance has come at the expense of rapid environmental deterioration. Amidst animated debate on the issue of global warming, this study attempts to explore the determinants of CO2 emissions in China using aggregate data for more than half a century. Adopting an analytical framework that combines the environmental literature with modern endogenous growth theories, the results indicate that CO2 emissions in China are negatively related to research intensity, technology transfer and the absorptive capacity of the economy to assimilate foreign technology. Our findings also indicate that more energy use, higher income and greater trade openness tend to cause more CO2 emissions.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
Issue (Month): 10 (August)
Pages: 2658-2665

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:10:p:2658-2665
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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