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Endogenous Growth and Cross-Country Income Differences

  • Peter Howitt

A multicountry Schumpeterian growth model is constructed. Because of technology transfer, R&D-performing countries converge to parallel growth paths; other countries stagnate. A parameter change that would have raised a country's growth rate in standard Schumpetarian theory will permanently raise its productivity and per capita income relative to other countries and raise the world growth rate. Transitional dynamics are analyzed for each country and for the world economy. Steady-state income differences obey the same equation as in neoclassical theory, but since R&D is positively correlated with investment rates, capital accumulation accounts for less than estimated by neoclassical theory.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.90.4.829
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 90 (2000)
Issue (Month): 4 (September)
Pages: 829-846

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:90:y:2000:i:4:p:829-846
Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.90.4.829
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