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Reassessing the empirical validity of the human-capital augmented neoclassical growth model

Author

Listed:
  • Elias Dinopoulos

    () (Department of Economics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA)

  • Peter Thompson

    () (Department of Economics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA)

Abstract

We reassess Mankiw, Romer and Weil's [mrw] version of the Solow model using, as did mrw, cross-sectional data to estimate the steady-state equation governing income per capita levels. The model fails in two critical areas. First, plausible factor shares obtained by mrw are not robust to the substitution of two measures of human capital that are more precise than the secondary school enrollment rates used by mrw. Second, the null hypothesis of an exogenous and identical level of technology in all countries is rejected. We also explain why the Solow model performed well despite the above shortcomings.

Suggested Citation

  • Elias Dinopoulos & Peter Thompson, 1999. "Reassessing the empirical validity of the human-capital augmented neoclassical growth model," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 135-154.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:9:y:1999:i:1:p:135-154
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Breton, Theodore R., 2004. "Can institutions or education explain world poverty? An augmented Solow model provides some insights," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 45-69, March.
    2. BLUM, Ulrich & DUDLEY, Leonard, 2001. "Religion and Economic Growth: Was Weber Right?," Cahiers de recherche 2001-05, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    3. Eric Berr & François Combarnous & Eric Rougier, 2005. "Too much consensus could be harmful : measuring the degree of implementation of the Washington consensus and its impact on economic growth," Documents de travail 116, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    4. Eckey, Hans-Friedrich & Kosfeld, Reinhold & Türck, Matthias, 2005. "Regional convergence in Germany: A geographically weighted regression approach," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 76, University of Kassel, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    5. Dinopoulos, Elias & Thompson, Peter, 2000. "Endogenous growth in a cross-section of countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 335-362, August.
    6. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn, 2016. "A Reassessment Of The Proximate Determinants Of Income Levels And Growth Of Nations," Working Papers 1609, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    7. Nevin Cavusoglu & Edinaldo Tebaldi, 2006. "Evaluating growth theories and their empirical support: An assessment of the convergence hypothesis," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 49-75.
    8. Cooray, Arusha & Paradiso, Antonio & Truglia, Francesco Giovanni, 2013. "Do countries belonging to the same region suggest the same growth enhancing variables? Evidence from selected South Asian countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 772-779.
    9. Peter Howitt, 2000. "Endogenous Growth and Cross-Country Income Differences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 829-846, September.
    10. Peter Thompson & Mihaela Pintea, 2005. "Technological Complexity, R&D and Education: Some Pleasant Arithmetic," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 185, Society for Computational Economics.
    11. Alicja Olejnik, 2008. "Using the spatial autoregressively distributed lag model in assessing the regional convergence of per-capita income in the EU25," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(3), pages 371-384, August.
    12. Mihaela Iulia Pintea & Peter Thompson, 2007. "Technological Complexity and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 276-293, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth ; Solow model ; Technology ; Human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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