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Gender-targeted job ads in the recruitment process: Facts from a Chinese job board

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  • Kuhn, Peter
  • Shen, Kailing
  • Zhang, Shuo

Abstract

We study how explicit employer requests for applicants of a particular gender enter the recruitment process on a Chinese job board, focusing on two questions: First, to what extent do employers’ requests affect the gender mix of a firm’s applicant pool? Second, how ‘hard’ are employers’ stated gender requests-- are they essential requirements, soft preferences, or something in between? Using internal data from a Chinese job board, we estimate that an explicit request for men raises men’s share in the applicant pool by 14.6 percentage points, or 26.4%; requests for women raises the female applicant share by 24.6 percentage points, or 55.0%. Men (women) who apply to gender-mismatched jobs also experience a substantial call-back penalty of 24 (43) percent. Thus, explicit gender requests do shape applicant pools, and signal a substantial but not absolute preference for the requested gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Kuhn, Peter & Shen, Kailing & Zhang, Shuo, 2020. "Gender-targeted job ads in the recruitment process: Facts from a Chinese job board," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:147:y:2020:i:c:s0304387820301061
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2020.102531
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    Cited by:

    1. Kuhn, Peter J. & Shen, Kailing, 2021. "What Happens When Employers Can No Longer Discriminate in Job Ads?," IZA Discussion Papers 14618, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Search; Discrimination; Gender; China; Segregation; Job board;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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