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The Effects Of Financial And Recognition Incentives Across Work Contexts: The Role Of Meaning

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  • Michael Kosfeld
  • Susanne Neckermann
  • Xiaolan Yang

Abstract

We manipulate workers' perceived meaning of a job in a field experiment and interact meaning of work with both financial and recognition incentives. Results show that workers exert more effort when meaning is high. Money has a positive effect on performance that is independent of meaning. In contrast, meaning and recognition interact negatively. Our results provide new insights into the stability of incentive effects across important work contexts. They also suggest that meaning and worker recognition may operate via the same motivational channel.
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Suggested Citation

  • Michael Kosfeld & Susanne Neckermann & Xiaolan Yang, 2017. "The Effects Of Financial And Recognition Incentives Across Work Contexts: The Role Of Meaning," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 237-247, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:1:p:237-247
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.12350
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    Cited by:

    1. Englmaier, Florian & Grimm, Stefan & Schindler, David & Schudy, Simeon, 2018. "The Effect of Incentives in Non-Routine Analytical Team Tasks - Evidence From a Field Experiment," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 71, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    2. repec:spr:scient:v:114:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2614-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Christiane Bradler & Susanne Neckermann, 2016. "The Magic of the Personal Touch: Field Experimental Evidence on Money and Appreciation as Gifts," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-045/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    4. Robert Dur & Max van Lent, 2018. "Socially Useless Jobs," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 18-034/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Bradler, Christiane & Neckermann, Susanne, 2016. "The magic of the personal touch: Field experimental evidence on money appreciation as gifts," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-043, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    6. Jeworrek, Sabrina & Mertins, Vanessa & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2018. ""The good news about bad news": Feedback about past organisational failure and its impact on worker productivity," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2018, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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