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The pric(z)e of hard work

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  • Hammermann, Andrea
  • Mohnen, Alwine

Abstract

Do non-monetary or monetary prizes induce the highest work performances in competitions? We conducted a real-effort lab experiment to test for differences in the effect of both incentives on work productivity. Our main findings are that the performances of subjects in pursuit of a monetary prize exceed those of subjects in pursuit of non-monetary incentives. However, the work quality and the retrospective feeling of having had fun at work, which is associated with the received prizes, decrease in combination with greater effort. Furthermore, a competition with monetary prizes appears to label winners and losers. If non-monetary prizes are used, losers are, to a certain extent, more able to adjust their feeling of satisfaction by changing the subjectively perceived prizes.

Suggested Citation

  • Hammermann, Andrea & Mohnen, Alwine, 2014. "The pric(z)e of hard work," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 1-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:1-15
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2014.04.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schall, Dominik L. & Mohnen, Alwine, 2017. "Incentivizing energy-efficient behavior at work: An empirical investigation using a natural field experiment on eco-driving," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 185(P2), pages 1757-1768.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Non-monetary incentives; Benefits; Work motivation; Experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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