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China's agriculture: drivers of change and implications for China and the rest of world

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  • Jikun Huang
  • Jun Yang
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

The overall goal of this article is to identify major changes in China's agriculture/food economy and their implications for both China itself and, more importantly, to the rest of world. China has become one of the fastest‐growing economies in the world since late 1970s. GDP grew at about 10% annually in the past 30 years. China's experience shows the importance of both domestic and external policies in achieving sustainable growth. The results from this study provide significant policy implications to many countries that are currently China's major trade partners or those seeking greater economic and trade relations with China. The main conclusions on the implications of China's rapid economic growth are that China's growth will provide more opportunities than challenges to the rest of the world, on average. Overall, the rest of the world will gain from China's economic expansion though this general conclusion may not hold for some countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jikun Huang & Jun Yang & Scott Rozelle, 2010. "China's agriculture: drivers of change and implications for China and the rest of world," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(s1), pages 47-55, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:41:y:2010:i:s1:p:47-55
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-0862.2010.00487.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-0862.2010.00487.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huang, Jikun. & Bouis, Howarth E., 1996. "Structural changes in the demand for food in Asia.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Fan, Shenggen, 1997. "Production and productivity growth in Chinese agriculture: new measurement and evidence," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 213-228, June.
    3. Shenggen Fan & Eric J. Wailes & Gail L. Cramer, 1995. "Household Demand in Rural China: A Two-Stage LES-AIDS Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(1), pages 54-62.
    4. Fan, Shenggan & Pardey, Philip G., 1997. "Research, productivity, and output growth in Chinese agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 115-137, June.
    5. Songqing Jin & Jikun Huang & Ruifa Hu & Scott Rozelle, 2002. "The Creation and Spread of Technology and Total Factor Productivity in China's Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(4), pages 916-930.
    6. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1992. "Rural Reforms and Agricultural Growth in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 34-51, March.
    7. Shenggen Fan, 1991. "Effects of Technological Change and Institutional Reform on Production Growth in Chinese Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(2), pages 266-275.
    8. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 1996. "Technological change: Rediscovering the engine of productivity growth in China's rural economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 337-369, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. van Oort, P.A.J. & Wang, G. & Vos, J. & Meinke, H. & Li, B.G. & Huang, J.K. & van der Werf, W., 2016. "Towards groundwater neutral cropping systems in the Alluvial Fans of the North China Plain," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 131-140.
    2. Yang, Jun & Wang, Xiaobing & Ma, Hengyun & Bai, Junfei & Jiang, Ye & Yu, Hai, 2014. "Potential usage, vertical value chain and challenge of biomass resource: Evidence from China’s crop residues," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 717-723.
    3. Tian, Qing & Holland, John H. & Brown, Daniel G., 2016. "Social and economic impacts of subsidy policies on rural development in the Poyang Lake Region, China: Insights from an agent-based model," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 12-27.
    4. Tianxiang Li & Tomas Baležentis & Lijuan Cao & Jing Zhu & Irena Kriščiukaitienė & Rasa Melnikienė, 2016. "Are the Changes in China’s Grain Production Sustainable: Extensive and Intensive Development by the LMDI Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-24, November.
    5. Zhang, C. & Sun, Y. & Hu, R., 2018. "Does urban-rural income inequality increase agricultural fertilizer or pesticide use? A provincial panel data analysis in China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277033, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Chen, Ruijian & Huang, Jikun & Qiao, Fangbin, 2013. "Farmers' knowledge on pest management and pesticide use in Bt cotton production in china," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 15-24.
    7. Wang, Xiaobing & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2017. "Off-farm employment and agricultural specialization in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 155-165.
    8. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters, in: Raghbendra Jha & Raghav Gaiha & Anil B. Deolalikar (ed.), Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. repec:zbw:espost:194799 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Jin, Shaosheng & Guo, Haiyue & Delgado, Michael S. & Wang, H. Holly, 2017. "Benefit or damage? The productivity effects of FDI in the Chinese food industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 1-9.
    11. Huang, Jikun & Yang, Jun & Deng, Xiangzheng & Wang, Jinxia & Rozelle, Scott, 2015. "Urbanization, Food Production and Food Security in China," 2015 Allied Social Sciences Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2015, Boston, Massachusetts 189685, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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