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Sequencing and the Success of Gradualism: Empirical Evidence from China's Agricultural Reform

This paper provides evidence regarding gains to agricultural market liberalization in China. We empirically identify the different effects that incentive reforms and gradual market liberalization have on China's agricultural economy during its transition period. We find that average gains within the agricultural sector to incentive reform exceed gains to market liberalization by a factor of ten. Our method of analyzing the effects of transition policies on economic performance can be generalized to other reform paths in other transition economies.

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File URL: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/debrauwsequencing.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Williams College in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2002-05.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2002-05
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  1. Jin, Songqing & Huang, Jikun & Hu, Ruifa & Rozelle, Scott, 2001. "The Creation And Spread Of Technology And Total Factor Productivity In China'S Agriculture," Working Papers 11981, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  2. Fan, Shenggen, 1990. "Effects Of Technological Change And Institutional Reform On Production Growth In Chinese Agriculture," Staff Papers 13454, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
  3. Roland, G. & Verdier, T., 1997. "Transition and the Output Fall," DELTA Working Papers 97-09, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  4. Epstein, Larry G, 1981. "Duality Theory and Functional Forms for Dynamic Factor Demands," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 81-95, January.
  5. Perkins, Dwight Heald, 1988. "Reforming China's Economic System," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 601-45, June.
  6. Robert E. Lucas & Jr., 1967. "Adjustment Costs and the Theory of Supply," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 321.
  7. Sachs, J.D. & Woo, W.T., 1994. "Structural Factors in the Economic Reforms of China, Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," Papers 94-01, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
  8. Knight, John & Song, Lina, 1999. "Employment Constraints and Sub-optimality in Chinese Enterprises," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 284-99, April.
  9. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1992. "Rural Reforms and Agricultural Growth in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 34-51, March.
  10. Rozelle, Scott, et al, 2000. "Bureaucrat to Entrepreneur: The Changing Role of the State in China's Grain Economy," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(2), pages 227-52, January.
  11. William L. Parish & Xiaoye Zhe & Fang Li, . "Nonfarm Work and Marketization of the Chinese Countryside," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 95-6, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  12. Epstein, Larry G & Denny, Michael G S, 1983. "The Multivariate Flexible Accelerator Model: Its Empirical Restrictions and an Application to U.S. Manufacturing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(3), pages 647-74, May.
  13. McMillan, John & Naughton, Barry, 1992. "How to Reform a Planned Economy: Lessons from China," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 130-43, Spring.
  14. McMillan, John & Whalley, John & Zhu, Lijing, 1989. "The Impact of China's Economic Reforms on Agricultural Productivity Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 781-807, August.
  15. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 1996. "Technological change: Rediscovering the engine of productivity growth in China's rural economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 337-369, May.
  16. Gallant, A. Ronald, 1977. "Three-stage least-squares estimation for a system of simultaneous, nonlinear, implicit equations," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 71-88, January.
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