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How Soy Labeling Influences Preference And Taste

Author

Listed:
  • Wansink, Brian
  • Park, Sea Bum
  • Sonka, Steven T.
  • Morganosky, Michelle A.

Abstract

Using a “Phantom Ingredient” taste test, this article demonstrates how the use of soy labels and health claims on a package negatively biased taste perceptions and attitudes toward a food erroneously thought to contain soy. Consumers who ate products which mentioned soy on the package described the taste more grainy, less flavorful, and as having a strong aftertaste compared to those who ate the product but saw no soy label. Yet, while putting “soy” on a package negatively influenced taste-conscious consumers, when combined with a health claim, it improved attitudes among consumers who are health-conscious, natural food lovers, or dieters. Our results and discussion provide better direction for researchers who work with ingredient labeling as well as for marketers who work with soybean products.

Suggested Citation

  • Wansink, Brian & Park, Sea Bum & Sonka, Steven T. & Morganosky, Michelle A., 2000. "How Soy Labeling Influences Preference And Taste," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 3(01).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:34571
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34571
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Julie A. Caswell & Eliza M. Mojduszka, 1996. "Using Informational Labeling to Influence the Market for Quality in Food Products," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1248-1253.
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    8. Moorman, Christine & Matulich, Erika, 1993. " A Model of Consumers' Preventive Health Behaviors: The Role of Health Motivation and Health Ability," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 208-228, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Veale, Roberta & Quester, Pascale, 2009. "Do consumer expectations match experience? Predicting the influence of price and country of origin on perceptions of product quality," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 134-144, April.
    2. Garavaglia, Christian & Marcoz, Elena Maria, 2014. "Willingness to pay for P.D.O. certification: an empirical investigation," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 5(1).
    3. Tyler Williams, 2007. "The effects of expectations on perception: experimental design issues and further evidence," Working Papers 07-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    4. Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Rimal, Arbindra, 2011. "Health claims and consumers' behavioral intentions: The case of soy-based food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 480-489, August.
    5. Chang, Jae Bong & Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K., 2012. "Consumer valuation of health attributes for soy-based food: A choice modeling approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 335-342.

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