IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Health claims and consumers' behavioral intentions: The case of soy-based food


  • Moon, Wanki
  • Balasubramanian, Siva K.
  • Rimal, Arbindra


This research evaluates the impact of two soy-specific health claims (highlighting FDA approval along with scientific results and simply describing scientific results) on stated behavioral intentions toward soy-based food using a survey administered by Ipsos-Observer to a nationally representative web panel in the summer of 2007. Our research design randomly assigned respondents to a health claim. Three ordered probit models (non-soy users; infrequent soy users; regular soy users) show that non-soy users and infrequent soy users who were exposed to either FDA health claim or general health claim are significantly more likely to eat soy-based food products. FDA or general health claim, however, did not change the behavioral intentions of regular soy users. These results suggest that soy consumption status moderates the impacts of health claims on behavioral intentions. However, the impact of FDA health claim did not differ from that of general health claim, indicating that the word 'FDA' did not add any additional information to consumers beyond the general health claim.

Suggested Citation

  • Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Rimal, Arbindra, 2011. "Health claims and consumers' behavioral intentions: The case of soy-based food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 480-489, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:4:p:480-489

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Golan, Elise & Unnevehr, Laurian, 2008. "Food product composition, consumer health, and public policy: Introduction and overview of special section," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 465-469, December.
    2. Eliza M. Mojduszka & Julie A. Caswell, 2000. "A Test of Nutritional Quality Signaling in Food Markets Prior to Implementation of Mandatory Labeling," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 298-309.
    3. Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Rimal, Arbindra, 2005. "Perceived Health Benefits and Soy Consumption Behavior: Two-Stage Decision Model Approach," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(02), August.
    4. Chern, Wen S & Loehman, Edna T & Yen, Steven T, 1995. "Information, Health Risk Beliefs, and the Demand for Fats and Oils," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(3), pages 555-564, August.
    5. Wansink, Brian & Park, Sea Bum & Sonka, Steven T. & Morganosky, Michelle A., 2000. "How Soy Labeling Influences Preference And Taste," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 3(01).
    6. Jutta Roosen & Stéphan Marette & Sandrine Blanchemanche & Philippe Verger, 2009. "Does Health Information Matter for Modifying Consumption? A Field Experiment Measuring the Impact of Risk Information on Fish Consumption," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 2-20.
    7. Mathios, Alan D., 1998. "The Importance Of Nutrition Labeling And Health Claim Regulation On Product Choice: An Analysis Of The Cooking Oils Market," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 27(2), October.
    8. Zaichkowsky, Judith Lynne, 1985. " Measuring the Involvement Construct," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(3), pages 341-352, December.
    9. Moorman, Christine & Matulich, Erika, 1993. " A Model of Consumers' Preventive Health Behaviors: The Role of Health Motivation and Health Ability," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 208-228, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Bi, Xiang & House, Lisa & Gao, Zhifeng, 2014. "Can Nutrition and Health Information Increase Demand for Seafood among Parents? Evidence from a Choice Experiment," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170266, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Jones, Michael S. & House, Lisa A. & Gao, Zhifeng, 2015. "Attribute Non-Attendance and Satisficing Behavior in Online Choice Experiments," 144th Seminar, February 9-13, 2015, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 206252, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Stavroula Malla & Jill E. Hobbs & Eric K. Sogah, 2016. "Estimating the Potential Benefits of New Health Claims in Canada: The Case of Soluble Fiber and Soy Protein," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 64(2), pages 173-197, June.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:4:p:480-489. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.