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Food product composition, consumer health, and public policy: Introduction and overview of special section

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  • Golan, Elise
  • Unnevehr, Laurian

Abstract

As efforts to improve diets in high income countries intensify, attention has turned to how policies may influence diet composition. The case studies in this special issue contribute to our understanding of how two main types of policies have influenced food product composition and dietary outcomes: (1) policies affecting food manufacturers' input costs and (2) information policy affecting competition. Research on the first type of policy is relatively new, but suggests that US commodity policies would not be good policy instruments to influence diets, except through the long run impacts of agricultural research. Research on the impacts of information policy continues to demonstrate that it can spur food industry competition to introduce healthier products, but may not result in healthier diets. International comparisons show where the US experience may have relevance for other high income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Golan, Elise & Unnevehr, Laurian, 2008. "Food product composition, consumer health, and public policy: Introduction and overview of special section," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 465-469, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:33:y:2008:i:6:p:465-469
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Unnevehr, Laurian J. & Jagmanaite, Evelina, 2008. "Getting rid of trans fats in the US diet: Policies, incentives and progress," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 497-503, December.
    2. Beghin, John C. & Jensen, Helen H., 2008. "Farm policies and added sugars in US diets," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 480-488, December.
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    5. Kim, Sung-Yong & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Capps, Oral, Jr., 2000. "The Effect Of Food Label Use On Nutrient Intakes: An Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 25(01), July.
    6. Mancino, Lisa & Kuchler, Fred & Leibtag, Ephraim, 2008. "Getting consumers to eat more whole-grains: The role of policy, information, and food manufacturers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 489-496, December.
    7. Miller, J. Corey & Coble, Keith H., 2007. "Cheap food policy: Fact or rhetoric?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 98-111, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Getu Hailu & John Cranfield & Rawlin Thangaraj, 2010. "Do U.S. food processors respond to sweetener-related health information?," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 348-368.
    2. Hellyer, Nicole Elizabeth & Fraser, Iain & Haddock-Fraser, Janet, 2012. "Food choice, health information and functional ingredients: An experimental auction employing bread," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 232-245.
    3. repec:kap:jcopol:v:40:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10603-017-9355-y is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Alexander E. Saak, 2011. "A Model of Labeling with Horizontal Differentiation and Cost Variability," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1131-1150.
    5. Bimbo, Francesco & Viscecchia, Rosaria & Nardone, Gianluca, 2012. "Does the alternative food supply network affect the human health?," 126th Seminar, June 27-29, 2012, Capri, Italy 126060, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Rimal, Arbindra, 2011. "Health claims and consumers' behavioral intentions: The case of soy-based food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 480-489, August.
    7. Hawkes, Corinna & Friel, Sharon & Lobstein, Tim & Lang, Tim, 2012. "Linking agricultural policies with obesity and noncommunicable diseases: A new perspective for a globalising world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 343-353.
    8. Apostolidis, Chrysostomos & McLeay, Fraser, 2016. "Should we stop meating like this? Reducing meat consumption through substitution," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 74-89.
    9. Sharma, Abhijit & di Falco, Salvatore & Fraser, Iain, 2015. "Consumption of Salt Rich Products in the UK: Impact of The Reduced Salt Campaign," MPRA Paper 62359, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Clementina Sebillote, 2013. "Efficiency of Public-Private Co-regulation in the Food Sector: the French Voluntary Agreements for Nutritional Improvements," Working Papers 2013-03, Alimentation et Sciences Sociales.
    11. Libby Hattersley, 2013. "Agri-food system transformations and diet-related chronic disease in Australia: a nutrition-oriented value chain approach," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 30(2), pages 299-309, June.
    12. Pieniak, Zuzanna & Verbeke, Wim & Olsen, Svein Ottar & Hansen, Karina Birch & Brunsø, Karen, 2010. "Health-related attitudes as a basis for segmenting European fish consumers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 448-455, October.
    13. McCarthy, Mark & Cluzel, Elodie & Dressel, Kerstin & Newton, Rachel, 2013. "Food and health research in Europe: Structures, gaps and futures," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 64-71.
    14. Martinez, Stephen W., 2013. "Introduction of New Food Products With Voluntary Health- and Nutrition-Related Claims, 1989-2010," Economic Information Bulletin 145319, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    15. Díaz-Méndez, Cecilia & Gómez-Benito, Cristóbal, 2010. "Nutrition and the Mediterranean diet. A historical and sociological analysis of the concept of a "healthy diet" in Spanish society," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 437-447, October.
    16. Mueller, Simone C. & Umberger, Wendy J., 2010. "“Pick the Tick” The Impact of Health Endorsements on Consumers’ Food Choices," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116436, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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