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Climate, ecosystem resilience and the slave trade

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  • Fenske, James
  • Kala, Namrata

Abstract

African societies exported more slaves in colder years. Lower temperatures reduced mortality and raised agricultural yields, lowering the cost of supplying slaves. Our results help explain African participation in the slave trade, which is associated with adverse outcomes today. We merge annual data on African temperatures with a panel of port-level slave exports to show that a typical port exported fewer slaves in a year when the local temperature was warmer than normal. This result is strongest where African ecosystems are least resilient to climate change, and is robust to several alternative specifications and robustness checks. We support our interpretation using evidence from the histories of Whydah, Benguela, and Mozambique.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 38398.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:38398

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Keywords: Africa; climate change; slave trade; temperature;

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Cited by:
  1. James Fenske & Namrata Kala, 2014. "1807: Economic shocks, conflict and the slave trade," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-02, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Anderson, R. Warren & Johnson, Noel D & Koyama, Mark, 2013. "From the Persecuting to the Protective State? Jewish Expulsions and Weather Shocks from 1100 to 1800," MPRA Paper 44228, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Dalton, John & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2013. "Dispersion and Distortions in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade," MPRA Paper 48224, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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