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Greed and grievance in civil war

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  • Paul Collier
  • Anke Hoeffler

Abstract

We investigate the causes of civil war, using a new data set of wars during 1960--99. Rebellion may be explained by atypically severe grievances, such as high inequality, a lack of political rights, or ethnic and religious divisions in society. Alternatively, it might be explained by atypical opportunities for building a rebel organization. While it is difficult to find proxies for grievances and opportunities, we find that political and social variables that are most obviously related to grievances have little explanatory power. By contrast, economic variables, which could proxy some grievances but are perhaps more obviously related to the viability of rebellion, provide considerably more explanatory power. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 56 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 563-595

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:56:y:2004:i:4:p:563-595

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  1. The Complex Ties Among Poverty, Development, and Security
    by Terra Lawson-Remer in Development Channel on 2012-07-19 17:40:14
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