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Citations for "Hit or Miss? The Effect of Assassinations on Institutions and War"

by Jones, Benjamin & Olken, Benjamin

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  1. Axel Dreher & Nathan Jensen, 2009. "Country or Leader? Political Change and UN General Assembly Voting," KOF Working papers 09-217, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  2. Filipe R. Campante & Davin Chor, 2011. "“The People Want the Fall of the Regime”:Schooling, Political Protest, and the Economy," Working Papers 03-2011, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  3. Gabriel P. Mathy & Nicholas L. Ziebarth, 2014. "How Much Does Political Uncertainty Matter? The Case of Louisiana Under Huey Long," Working Papers 2014-06, American University, Department of Economics.
  4. Mark Gradstein & Alberto E. Chong, 2008. "Who Needs Strong Leaders?," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6734, Inter-American Development Bank.
  5. Andrew K. Rose & Mark M. Spiegel, 2009. "The Olympic effect," Working Paper Series 2009-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  6. Alberto Chong & Mark Gradstein, 2008. "¿A quién le hacen falta líderes autoritarios?," Research Department Publications 4564, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  7. Beate R. Jochimsen & Sebastian Thomasius, 2012. "The Perfect Finance Minister: Whom to Appoint as Finance Minister to Balance the Budget?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1188, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Puga, Diego & Trefler, Daniel, 2012. "International trade and institutional change: Medieval Venice's response to globalization," CEPR Discussion Papers 9076, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Benno Torgler & Bruno Frey, 2013. "Politicians: be killed or survive," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(1), pages 357-386, July.
  10. Gabriel Leon, 2014. "Loyalty for sale? Military spending and coups d’etat," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 363-383, June.
  11. Axel Dreher & Peter Nunnenkamp & Maya Schmaljohann, 2013. "The Allocation of German Aid: Self-interest and Government Ideology," Kiel Working Papers 1817, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  12. Paul J Burke, 2011. "Economic Growth and Political Survival," Departmental Working Papers 2011-06, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  13. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2010. "Civil War," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(1), pages 3-57, March.
  14. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 2007. "The Growth Effect of Democracy: Is It Heterogeneous and How Can It Be Estimated?," CEPR Discussion Papers 6339, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Timothy Besley & Masayuki Kudamatsu, 2007. "Making autocracy work," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3764, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  16. Daniel Berger & William Easterly & Nathan Nunn & Shanker Satyanath, 2010. "Commercial Imperialism? Political Influence and Trade During the Cold War," NBER Working Papers 15981, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Richard Jong-A-Pin & Shu Yu, 2010. "Do coup leaders matter? Leadership change and economic growth in politically unstable countries," KOF Working papers 10-252, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  18. Minkler, Lanse & Prakash, Nishith, 2015. "The Role of Constitutions on Poverty: A Cross-National Investigation," IZA Discussion Papers 8877, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. Efraim Benmelech & Claude Berrebi & Esteban F. Klor, 2010. "The Economic Cost of Harboring Terrorism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 54(2), pages 331-353, April.
  20. Braunfels, Elias, 2014. "How do Political and Economic Institutions Affect Each Other?," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 19/2014, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics.
  21. Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2010. "Aid and Conditionality," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.