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¿A quién le hacen falta líderes autoritarios?

  • Alberto Chong

    ()

  • Mark Gradstein

El modelo de este trabajo hace pensar que un líder autoritario, a pesar de disfrutar de una escasa supervisión por parte del poder legislativo, puede gozar de respaldo popular. El argumento es que ese respaldo se induce con la intención de que los pobres contrarresten la subversión de la protección oficial de los derechos de propiedad de que gozan los ricos y para lograrlo a menudo están dispuestos a pagar el precio de aceptar la malversación de ingresos tributarios por parte del líder para fines privados. En este trabajo, que analiza las actitudes individuales hacia un liderazgo autoritario, se descubre que el apoyo a un liderazgo fuerte guarda una relación inversa al ingreso individual y a la desigualdad de ingresos en todo el país.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4564.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4564
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  1. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-79, April.
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