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Weak instruments and weak identification in estimating the effects of education on democracy

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  • Coviello, Decio
  • Bobba, Matteo

Abstract

Is there any relation between education and democracy? Once we correct for weak instruments and identify education as "weakly exogenous" we find new evidence that education systematically predicts democracy. Our results are robust across model specification, instrumentation strategies, and samples.

Suggested Citation

  • Coviello, Decio & Bobba, Matteo, 2011. "Weak instruments and weak identification in estimating the effects of education on democracy," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1560, Inter-American Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:brikps:1560
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    educación; democracia;

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