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Do More Educated Leaders Raise Citizens' Education?

  • Diaz-Serrano, Luis

    ()

    (Universitat Rovira i Virgili)

  • Pérez, Jessica

    ()

    (Universitat Rovira i Virgili)

This paper looks at the contribution of political leaders to enhance citizens' education and investigate how the educational attainment of the population is affected while a leader with higher education remains in office. For this purpose, we consider educational transitions of political leaders in office and find that the educational attainment of population increases when a more educated leader remains in office. Furthermore, we also observe that the educational attainment of the population is negatively impacted when a country transitions from an educated leader to a less educated one. This result may help to explain the previous finding that more educated political leaders favor economic growth.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7661.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7661
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